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Thomas Rhett’s ‘Life Changes’ Debuts As #1 All-Genre Album

ALL ACCESS congratulates VALORY MUSIC CO. artist THOMAS RHETT and his team for a #1 all-genre album debut on “Life Changes,” which totaled 123,000 equivalent album units its first … more

Americana Music Association Unveils 14th Annual Honors & Awards Performers, Presenters

The AMERICANA MUSIC ASSOCIATION revealed its initial performer and presenter lineup for its 14th annual HONORS & AWARDS SHOW at the RYMAN AUDITORIUM, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16th, hosted by … more

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Arkansas to become open carry state on August 15th

Arkansas will become the nation’s 45th open carry state on August 15th of this year. This result arises from the Arkansas legislature’s enactment of HB 1700, a bill sponsored by Representative Denny Altes (R – Fort Smith) which amended Arkansas Code § 5-73-120 (Carrying a weapon).

Police shooting inspires instant protest in Little Rock


Frustration over the Trayvon Martin case boils into a protest at 12th and Jefferson.
by David Koon

Nobody has to say it, but the timing couldn’t have been worse.

Two days after a Florida jury found George Zimmerman not guilty of all charges in the killing of unarmed teenager Trayvon Martin, with black America boiling over with frustration about the justice system, a Little Rock police officer shot and killed 26-year-old Deon Williams near the corner of 12th and Jefferson.

According to a LRPD release, just before noon on Monday, Officers Grant Humphries and Terry McDaniel saw a Chevy Suburban on 12th Street that they believed to be stolen. (Officials would later confirm that the truck was, in fact, not stolen.)

When the officers pulled the SUV over, police say, the driver jumped out and fled. McDaniel pursued on foot, while Humphries took off in the squad car, trying to cut Williams off. As McDaniel chased Deon Williams into the backyard of a house on Adams Street, a gun fell out of Williams’ waistband, according to the police. When Williams stopped to pick up the gun and turned toward McDaniel, the police narrative says, McDaniel feared for his life, and fired three times. Williams, who was paroled in May after serving two years in prison on charges of possession of a controlled substance and robbery, was pronounced dead at UAMS at 12:17 p.m.

McDaniel, a black officer, has used deadly force at least once before. He fatally shot a man who pulled a gun on him when interrupted during a daytime home burglary on Thayer Street last year. The burglar had earlier fatally shot one man and wounded another at the home.

Information about the shooting spread through social media. At 1 p.m., someone tweeted that the person killed by the police had been an 11-year-old boy, shot nine times in the back. A crowd of angry people began to gather at the Hess gas station on 12th street, just across from the crime scene.

By 1:30 p.m., the biggest swell of the crowd had grown to at least 200, simmering under the July sun. Dozens more watched from the parking lots of businesses and the yards of nearby houses. Several of the protestors closest to the sidewalk, where the police soon lined up in a black wall of uniforms, held signs that called for justice for Bobby Moore, the teenage burglar who was shot by LRPD officer Josh Hastings in August 2012 as Moore tried to flee a West Little Rock apartment complex. Hastings’ manslaughter trial in the case ended in a hung jury last month.

As the protest grew, crowding into the rectangle of shade under the awning of the gas station, the clerk at the station came to the door, ushered the last customers out, then locked it behind them, followed by a set of heavy steel bars. Soon, the neon beer signs in the windows went out, along with the lights inside. A man came to the doors and tugged on them. Another splashed ice tea against the glass, then threw the can against the doors. Kids with cell phones filmed him, waiting for something worthy of YouTube to happen, but instead he just walked away in disgust, disappearing back into the crowd.

Overhead, a state police chopper circled the intersection of 12th and Jefferson at 300 feet. At the edge of the crowd, people cursed it, many of them screaming obscenities at the sky and flipping the bird with both hands, trying to telegraph their anger and frustration to the pilot.

Ernest Franklin, president of Say Stop the Violence, was there, sweating into a suit coat as he walked among the crowds of angry young people in tank tops and shorts. He said he had talked to police on the scene, asking them to close 12th Street to keep curious drivers from driving by. Soon after we spoke, the street was blocked to most traffic.

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“I’ve asked them to get somebody down here other than the police officers,” he said. “Right now, the whole nation, no matter where you go, they’re mad at the police. We do understand that the police officers have to do their job, but people are out here looking for justice and to get justice served, whatever that is going to take.”

The police brought in more squad cars, running them in almost bumper to bumper in the eastbound lane of 12th Street. “Nobody goes into the crowd,” an officer standing in the street said, and the word went on down the line. One man taunted the cops, saying, “What if it was your kid going down the alley? Y’all ain’t perfect.” Another man shouted, “Fuck America! That’s how I feel.”

Asa Muhammad was standing at the corner of 12th and Jefferson, watching investigators work across the street. A member of the Nation of Islam, Muhammad was at the Pulaski Country courthouse during the Josh Hastings trial.

“The police brutality and the police actions toward our people is not justice,” Muhammad said. “It doesn’t take the police gunning down our people to make an arrest or stop a crime … one shot or a taser to the leg could take a man down, but not a deadly force bullet to his heart or in his back to kill him. They’re professionals. They have tasers. They’re taught to shoot a weapon. But unfortunately, just like Bobby Moore was shot, this gentleman was shot. Another loss for our community.”

Muhammad said a lot of the anger on display had to do with the economic conditions many blacks find themselves in. “If our economic situation was better, and our people were afforded jobs to do better for themselves, then the vast majority of this wouldn’t be. But unfortunately, in this area, the vast majority of the people you see are unemployed. That has a great effect on what’s going on.”

More cops came. A roaring line of black and white Harley-Davidsons. A lumbering SWAT truck. Dozens of cops stretched their line down the turn lane of 12th Street, just behind the row of squad cars. Someone threw a can of soda, which sailed over the line and landed in the street.

Schwanda Daugherty was there in the edge of the crowd. “This is a community thing,” she said. “I’m here to support them even though I don’t know the young man. We’re out here, we’re going to protest, we’re going to show that we care. … There’s a lot of frustration. It’s happening, and we want everybody to know it’s happening. It’s a racial issue. It never went away, and it’s never going away. But we’re going to stand up and fight.”

As the afternoon wore on, tensions rose. At times, the crowd pushed forward toward the patrol cars, at others, they shrank back to the shade. A woman tried to get others to hold hands and form a human chain along the street, but was ignored until she gave up. Another woman in a gray halter-top shouted over the angry din of the crowd: “All we are to them is monkeys and dogs.” Someone threw a brown bottle that thumped in the grass on the other side of the street. The helicopter buzzed overhead, forgotten now that there were plenty of terrestrial cops to hate.

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Then, walking along the edge of 12th Street, supported by friends, came a sobbing woman named Shemedia Shelton. Shelton was the owner of the Suburban Williams had been driving, and identified herself as Williams’ wife.

“You didn’t have to kill him,” she screamed. “Trayvon wasn’t enough? You didn’t have to fucking kill him. You didn’t have to kill him. You didn’t have to fucking kill him.”

Chastity Duffy, the woman supporting Shelton, said that they’d just picked Williams up from Tucker Penitentiary two months before.

“He was just trying to do what was right for his wife and kids,” Duffy said. “He didn’t do nothing.” At Duffy’s elbow, clinging there, shambling along in the sun toward the protest, Shelton wailed variations on a single sentence: “Can anybody tell me what I’m supposed to tell my kids?”

The heat came down, broken by periodic clouds. For three minutes, a burly cop stood in the door of a cruiser and spoke into a loudspeaker, telling the crowd to disperse, that they were participating in an unlawful assembly, that they would be arrested if they didn’t comply, saying it over and over like a machine. The crowd roared back at him, drowning him out with taunts and curses. There was a sense that something was going to happen. Eventually, the officer on the loudspeaker stopped, his voice replaced by that of a man who said he wasn’t a police officer, that he wanted to lead them to a park where they could continue the protest, that there would be a candlelight vigil that night they could attend. The crowd clenched into a fist before him and shouted him down too. Though a peaceful vigil would be held that night at the State Capitol, that moment was too angry and hot for talk of peace.

Police Chief Stuart Thomas appeared, along with City Manager Bruce Moore, both standing in front of the Family Dollar store across the street. Behind them, the shooting investigation started to wrap up. Police tape came down. A flatbed came for the Suburban Williams had been driving. Soon, the line of Harleys fired up and roared away, followed by most of the squad cars, some making a slow U-turn in the street.

Across the street, Chief Thomas spoke to the press, pulling further back when the chants of “fuck the police” became loud enough for the mics to pick them up and spoil a quote. “As we were working the case, a lot of information got out,” Thomas said. “People were a little bit misinformed about the circumstances … it just kind of built up from there. There are a lot of other issues at play, both locally and nationally.” A minute later, someone shouted “Look out!” as a full plastic bottle came out of the crowd, over the street, and over Thomas’s head — a hail-Mary lob that would have done any quarterback proud. The bottle splattered eight feet away in the parking lot, next to a snarl of police tape.

“It is what it is,” Thomas said of being the target of the bottle. “It’ll calm down when we’re out of here.”

Soon after, the last of the cops pulled away, and the crowd soon did as Thomas had predicted. By the time the TV stations did their 5 p.m. live shots from the corner of 12th and Jefferson, there was just a single man in a white T-shirt, holding a sign. Once the cameras turned off, he disappeared, too.

Standing on the corner, watching people buy gas at the Hess station and 12th street roll full of cars again, it was hard to believe the anger of the day had ever happened. Then a woman pulled up to the herd of TV trucks and rolled down her window. “What is it,” she asked, “open season on black people?”

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International Peace Day, Rosh Hashannah, Fall Equinox

So many festivals this week. Wednesday (east coast) is Virgo new moon just after midnight. In the evening, at sunset, Rosh Hashanah (Jewish New Year) begins. Thursday is the UN World Peace Day and, in the evening, as the new moon is sighted as sunset, Islamic New Year begins. Friday, as Sun enters Libra (1:02pm, west coast), Archangel Michael, the great protector with sword in hand, assumes protection for the Earth. At that moment, Autumn begins. It’s equinox. Day and night, light and dark are in balance. We, too, seek balance and begin preparing for Winter Solstice. We are in the “dark half of the year” now.

On Friday, in the United States, transiting (in the sky) Uranus squares the U.S. natal Pluto. We’ll see what happens. Uranus/Pluto signify unexpected & transformative events unfolding. Let’s see what happens.

Much has been said in Christian circles about Saturday, September 23rd, concerning Revelation 12 – “A great sign appeared in heaven: a woman (pregnant, about to give birth) is clothed with the sun, moon under her feet, a crown of twelve stars on her head. Then another sign appears: a red dragon with seven crowned heads, ten horns. Its tail sweeping a third of the stars from the sky, flinging them to the earth.” We’ll watch for that, too. While waiting, watching and wondering, let’s be festive.

Gathering with family, eating pomegranates (Garden of Ededn “apples”), honey with apples, honey cake, apple raisin challah & chicken baked in honey, wishing everyone a sweet and happy new year. (Rosh Hashanah).

Dancing Peace dances during World Peace Day. It’s theme: “Together for Peace: Respect, Safety and Dignity for All.” From 9:00am – 9:30am, the Secretary General begins Peace Day celebrations by ringing the Peace Bell in the U.N. Peace Garden. Inscribed on the bell in Japanese characters, “Long live absolute world peace.” Peace on Earth, Goodwill to everyone on this day. www.internationaldayofpeace.org/


 

ARIES: Do you feel divided between four ways, standing in the middle wondering which paths to pursue next? There are several past issues that need tending and closure before you will know how to proceed. They are being presented to you now so observe, assess, ponder, pray and have the intention to carefully and kindly complete all things unfinished. Then the next page turns.

TAURUS: Maintain the trajectory into the future even though pressures and people pull you back. The new realities must be brought forth and each sign has the responsibility for a facet of that diamond. Taurus has the illumination needed for others to understand the plans and purposes of the new era. You have land to buy, a model to construct, a community to build, a garden to plant, expansions to bring forth so that many will be saved.

GEMINI: You experience confusion when you don’t stand directly in the center of all realities. You must do this to observe both sides in order to create a triangle of synthesis, with you standing at the apex. There are two paths outlined for you. Knowledge creates thought which creates symbols which reveal revelations so Right Choice can occur. Ponder upon these words. Draw and visualize the seven pointed, six pointed, five pointed stars, a triangle and the Cross. Again.

CANCER: A fusion and synthesis are occurring between what you were taught and what you now know and seek. Money is a concern. Know it will always be available. With others be kind, never critical. Listen deeply. Respond with compassion, never impatience. The homeopath Aconite neutralizes impatience (an excess of electrical energy). At times you feel like a rainstorm.

LEO: It’s possible that thoughts and feelings from previous relationships are being remembered. It’s possible there could be anger about the experiences in childhood which influences your behavior in adult relationships. It’s good to ask what you learned in each relationship. And to ask, “Did I give enough?” There’s still time. Everyone is learning from everyone else, all the time. Your self-identity changes.

VIRGO: Tend to finances; ask for assistance if puzzled, embrace the future by investing in supplies to sustain you and others for two years. Plan on others joining you. When self-critical beliefs occur, heartache results. It’s important to know the difference between good and evil, dispassion and intrusion. It’s best to always use words of praise, which neutralizes mental and emotional illusions and distortions.

LIBRA: Something profound, transformative and new has been occurring at home affecting the foundations of your life. Through autumn you’ll know more. Good things are coming about in your professional life. Is family visiting, changing or are you missing kinfolk? Are you thinking about religions or spirituality? Tend with care and kindness to all relationships. Your group sustains, nourishes and fortifies you. But someone’s left out.

SCORPIO: It may feel that you need to structure your surroundings so that nothing is left to chance. Also, you want to nurture and build an even growing participation in a social sphere. Groups need you and you need the group for sustenance. You wonder what to do with your money as you are offered two choices. One grows, one dims. How do you decide which to choose? Which is more sustainable? Think precious metals.

SAGITTARIUS: It’s time for something new in terms of relationships. Is it also time to travel somewhere you’ve been before to assess it with new eyes. Do be aware of how much work you’ve done, how hard and where you are today. In the next eighteen months, your usual ways of thinking and interpreting will change. Your creativity will change, too. Some of this is already occurring. Is it topsy-turvy at home with life tumbling about?

CAPRICORN: You asked for a playful column. I see why. Pluto and Juno in your first house of self-identity. Everything about your life is deep and profound and you need someone else to make the jokes freeing you from the Plutonian depths. Let’s not talk about money. You have enough. You don’t have enough. You have enough. In between is a childhood wound. You desire to transform all environments. There is a prayer that turns your abode into a shrine.

AQUARIUS: There’s a new reality in your life as the old realities tumble after. Perhaps you grew up with too little or more than enough money. Either reality offered you a certain lens concerning money. And here we are today, the monetary world collapsing. Don’t be fearful. From the ashes emerge great opportunities. Ponder upon priorities considering the world situation. What must (can) you do now? You’ll come to true answers.

PISCES: Things feel very complex. In your state of solitude all expectations are surfacing, informing you they must be forgotten. Disappointments, sadnesses and unrealized hopes, leading to despair, can actually make us ill. It’s important to be aware of this. Then see a holistic doctor who does astrology with homeopathy. Deep, deeper to deepest layers will be uncovered. In safety. The new psychology.


Risa – writer, teacher, mentor, counselor, astrologer, esotericist

Founder & Director – Esoteric & Astrological Studies & Research Institute,

~a contemporary Wisdom School

Email: risagoodwill@gmail.com.

Website: www.nightlightnews.org/

Facebook: Risa’s Esoteric Astrology

Note: all FB posts are also on NLN under Daily Studies

Ex-BF Wants To Be BFF

True love might become friendship … or not

My boyfriend — who dumped me — says he wants to be friends (talk to me, see me sometimes), but I’m not ready for that because I’m still in love with him. A female co-worker said that if he can be friends, he was never in love with me to begin with — that if he’d really loved me, he’d hate me now. Is this true?

— Feeling Worse

According to your office Socrates, “How do I love thee? Let me count the ways” should be answered with “I slashed your tires. I sprinkled a strong laxative in your latte. And I’m looking forward to chasing you down the street while waving highly realistic replicas of scary medieval weapons…”

Romantic love actually comes in two flavors — “passionate” and “companionate” — explains social psychologist Elaine Hatfield. Passionate love is the initial “wildly emotional,” lusty kind that wanes over time. Companionate love, on the other hand, involves “friendly affection and deep attachment” — deep appreciation for who somebody is and what they do and believe in — and tends to have more staying power.

The difference between the two is best illustrated in relation to what we’ll call “car trouble.” Passionate love is what leads to the physics problem of how to have sex in a Porsche in your driveway (because going inside and doing it in the foyer instead would take too long). Companionate love likewise gets two people working out a physics problem in a car; however, it’s trying to collectively muster the NASA-level intelligence required to install an infant car seat.

Companionate love does sometimes lead to “I hate you! I hate you”-style loathing, but typically just when there’s been a betrayal. But sometimes what people call love is really an unhealthy dependency with sparkly hearts painted on it — one person using the other as a sort of human grout, to fill the empty spaces in themselves so they can take a shortcut to feeling whole. In this situation, “I’m nothing without you!” really does feel like the case, and who doesn’t hate a person who makes them feel like nothing?

However, real love doesn’t suddenly curdle into hate. If the respect and the “wow, you’re an amazeballs person” and all the rest was there, that remains as a base — even when the relationship tanks. Even so, this doesn’t necessarily mean you should convert your ex into your BFF. What you should do with respect to your ex — now and in the future — is whatever works for you, when it works for you. This may mean never seeing or speaking to your ex again — despite any “love becomes hate!” urging from your co-worker that you owe him a scolding phone call: “If you’d ever really loved me, you’d want the best for me now — the best undetectable poison money can buy!”


(c)2017, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405, or e-mail AdviceAmy@aol.com (advicegoddess.com). Weekly radio show: blogtalkradio.com/amyalkon. Order Amy Alkon’s book, “Good Manners For Nice People Who Sometimes Say The F-Word” (St. Martin’s Press, June 3, 2014) at amazon.com.

 

LIVE! in NWA

Exile — Born in Richmond, Ky., way back in 1963, “The Exiles” — as the band was first named — “cooked up rabble-rousing musical concoctions of rawknroll, R&B & LA-scenster pop.” The big break came in 1978, when “Kiss You All Over” spent four weeks at the top of Billboard’s pop chart, then the band turned country with hits like “I Don’t Want to Be A Memory” or “Give Me One More Chance.” Exile takes the stage at the Alma Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. today. Tickets are $25-$41 at 632-2129.

Exile — Born in Richmond, Ky., way back in 1963, “The Exiles” — as the band was first named — “cooked up rabble-rousing musical concoctions of rawknroll, R&B & LA-scenster pop.” The big break came in 1978, when “Kiss You All Over” spent four weeks at the top of Billboard’s pop chart, then the band turned country with hits like “I Don’t Want to Be A Memory” or “Give Me One More Chance.” Exile takes the stage at the Alma Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. today. Tickets are $25-$41 at 632-2129.

Today (9/21)

Coverblind — After 5 Bar, Rogers.

Buddy Shute & the Motivators — Bear’s Place, Fayetteville.

Cameron Johnson — 6 p.m., Bike Rack Brewing Co., Bentonville.

Nick Swaim & Triple Threat — 7 p.m., Choctaw Casino, Pocola, Okla.

Dane Clayton’s Opium Western — Foghorn’s on Green Acres, Fayetteville.

Taylor Jones — Foghorn’s on West 15th, Fayetteville.

Danny Mullen — Foghorn’s, Rogers.

Lukas Wigington — Foghorn’s, Springdale.

Bikes, Blues & BBQ — 1 p.m.-close on both stages. George’s Majestic Lounge, Fayetteville.

Lazy Daisy — JJ’s Grill, Dickson Street.

Jeff Fox — JJ’s Grill, Fayetteville.

Isayah — Kingfish, Fayetteville.

Aaron Kamm and The One Drops — 8 p.m., Meteor Guitar Gallery, Bentonville. $8-$10.

Sassy and the Fras — Mojo’s Pints & Pies, Fayetteville.

Mark Shields Band — 8 p.m., Rowdy Beaver Den, Eureka Springs.


Matt Maher — Eight-time Grammy-nominated contemporary Christian singer/songwriter Matt Maher will perform a free concert at 6 p.m. Friday on the campus mall at the University of the Ozarks in Clarksville. The “Lord, I Need You” singer is also known for songs like “Hold Us Together” and “Christ Is Risen.” ozarks.edu/WAIS.

Matt Maher — Eight-time Grammy-nominated contemporary Christian singer/songwriter Matt Maher will perform a free concert at 6 p.m. Friday on the campus mall at the University of the Ozarks in Clarksville. The “Lord, I Need You” singer is also known for songs like “Hold Us Together” and “Christ Is Risen.” ozarks.edu/WAIS.

Friday

Jay Yates — 7 p.m., After 5 Bar, Rogers.

Buddy Shute & the Motivators — Bear’s Place, Fayetteville.

Trumann Rail Boys — 8 p.m., Black Apple Crossing, Springdale.

Larry B & The Cradle Rockers — 10 p.m., Choctaw Casino, Pocola, Okla.

Josh McClard Band — 7 p.m., Foghorn’s on Green Acres, Fayetteville.

Route 358 — 7 p.m., Foghorn’s on W. 15th, Fayetteville.

Barn Party — Route 358 celebrates their album release on Friday at the Barn Party at the Shiloh Museum from 6 to 8:30 p.m. The band’s dual vocalists and acoustic instruments blend folk, rock, pop, country and bluegrass. Bring lawn chairs and coolers to bid summer farewell. Free. downtownspringdale.org.

Barn Party — Route 358 celebrates their album release on Friday at the Barn Party at the Shiloh Museum from 6 to 8:30 p.m. The band’s dual vocalists and acoustic instruments blend folk, rock, pop, country and bluegrass. Bring lawn chairs and coolers to bid summer farewell. Free. downtownspringdale.org.

John Spurling— 7 p.m., Foghorn’s, Rogers.

Caleb Martin — 7 p.m., Foghorn’s, Springdale.

Bikes Blues & BBQ — noon-close, with Groovement, Vintage Pistol, Lucas Parker and more. George’s Majestic Lounge, Fayetteville.

Mark Shields & Good Co. — 7 p.m., JJ’s Grill, Bella Vista.

Shotgun Billys — JJ’s Grill, Dickson Street.

Ouachita River Band — 8:30 p.m., JJ’s Grill, Fayetteville.

Whippersnapper — 8:30 p.m., JJ’s Grill, Fort Smith.

Jamie Wolfe & the Wranglers — 8:30 p.m., JJ’s Grill, Rogers.

One for the Money — Jose’s Restaurant & Club, Tontitown.

Charliehorse — Kingfish, Fayetteville.

The Old Fashioned — Mojo’s Pints & Pies, Fayetteville.

Techno Grinder — 9 p.m. with Gcubed, Shane Logan, and Akta. Nomads Music Lounge, Fayetteville. $5.

Sarah Loethen — 8 p.m., The Odd Soul, Springdale.

Matt Garland & the Shotgun Reunion — 8 p.m.; Luke Williams at noon. Rowdy Beaver Den, Eureka Springs.

Downtown Springdale Barn Party — 6-8:30 p.m. with Route 358. Shiloh Museum, Springdale.

Sad Palomino — with The Coax, and High Waisted. Smoke & Barrel Tavern, Fayetteville.

Handmade Moments — 6 p.m., Stage Eighteen, Fayetteville. $15.

Randall Shreve — 7 p.m., Tontitown Winery, Tontitown.

Matt Maher — 6 p.m., University of the Ozarks, Clarksville.


Saturday

Sara Loethen — 7 p.m., After 5 Bar, Rogers.

Community Center — 8 p.m., Black Apple Crossing, Springdale.

Tommy Katona — 8 p.m. Stevie Ray Vaughan tribute, Cherokee Casino, West Siloam Springs, Okla.

Luke Pell — 10 p.m., Choctaw Casino, Pocola, Okla.

Justin Kaleb Driggers — 9 p.m., Emma Ave Bar & Tap, Springdale.

Cowboy Musician Marshall Mitchell — 10:30 a.m., Fayetteville Public Library.

Route 358 — 7 p.m., The Forge, Bentonville.

Bikes Blues & BBQ — noon-midnight, with Mountain Sprout, Jason D. Williams, Arkansauce, and more. George’s Majestic Lounge, Fayetteville.

Pearson Bros. — 7 p.m., JJ’s Grill, Bella Vista.

412 West — JJ’s Grill, Dickson Street.

Jamie Wolfe & the Wranglers — 8:30 p.m., JJ’s Grill, Fayetteville.

The Crumbs — 8:30 p.m., JJ’s Grill, Fort Smith.

Mr. Lucky — 8:30 p.m., JJ’s Grill, Rogers.

We B Jammin — Jose’s Restaurant & Club, Tontitown.

Stephen Neeper & the Wild Hearts — Kingfish, Fayetteville.

Rev. Jimmy Bratcher Band — 8 p.m., Meteor Guitar Gallery, Bentonville.

Jimmy Wayne & Liberty Bell — Mojo’s Pints & Pies, Fayetteville.

The Black Oak Band — 7p.m. season finale, NEBCO Community Center, Garfield.

Mother Moon — 8 p.m., with Grey Horse. Nomads Music Lounge, Fayetteville.

Terri & the Executives — 8 p.m.; Terri & Brett at noon. Rowdy Beaver Den, Eureka Springs.

DJ M. Bolez — Smoke & Barrel Tavern, Fayetteville.

Steve Dimmitt — 7 p.m., Tontitown Winery, Tontitown.


Sunday

School of Rock — 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Meteor Guitar Gallery, Bentonville.

The Baskins — 1 p.m., Terra Studios, Durham.


Tuesday

Keith Nicholson — 5 p.m., JJ’s Grill, Bella Vista.

Tony Alvarez — JJ’s Grill, Dickson Street.

Jeff Fox — 6 p.m., JJ’s Grill, Fayetteville.

Richard Burnett — 6 p.m., JJ’s Grill, Fort Smith.

Jason Campbell — 6 p.m., JJ’s Grill, Rogers.

Joe Giles and the Homewreckers — Jose’s Restaurant & Club, Tontitown.

Jed Clampit — 7 p.m., Pesto Cafe, Fayetteville.


Wednesday

Pinetop Renegades — 7 p.m., Foghorn’s, Rogers.

Drive by Truckers — 9 p.m., with Strand of Oaks. George’s Majestic Lounge, Fayetteville. $25.

Kaleb Cecil — 5 p.m., JJ’s Grill, Bella Vista.

Johnny Dale Roberts — JJ’s Grill, Dickson Street.

Michael Cooper — 6 p.m., JJ’s Grill, Fayetteville.

Jason Campbell — 6 p.m., JJ’s Grill, Fort Smith.

Jeff Fox — 6 p.m., JJ’s Grill, Rogers.

Isayah’s Allstars — Mojo’s Pints & Pies, Fayetteville.

Please send info about your upcoming concerts and events to Jocelyn.

— Jocelyn Murphy

jmurphy@nwadg.com

Bikes, Blues & BBQ Schedule

NWA Democrat-Gazette/ANDY SHUPE Riders make their way down Dickson Street Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, during the 17th annual Bikes, Blues & BBQ motorcycle rally in Fayetteville. Visit nwadg.com/photos to see more photographs from the rally.

NWA Democrat-Gazette/ANDY SHUPE
Riders make their way down Dickson Street Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, during the 17th annual Bikes, Blues & BBQ motorcycle rally in Fayetteville. Visit nwadg.com/photos to see more photographs from the rally.

Today (9/21)

9 a.m.-5 p.m. — CAF AirPower History Tour, Arkansas Air and Military Museum

9 a.m.-7:30 p.m. — Baum Motorcycle Village open

11 a.m.-8 p.m. — Arvest Ballpark open

11:30 a.m.-11:30 p.m. — A&M Railroad shuttle

Noon-midnight — Washington County Fairgrounds Saloon open

2-7 p.m. — Military Appreciation Event, Arvest Ballpark, Springdale

3-11 p.m. — Dickson Street Beer Garden open

8 p.m. — Mr. Bikes, Blues and BBQ, Blues Alley Saloon, Washington County Fairgrounds


NWA Democrat-Gazette/ANDY SHUPE Riders make their way Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, along Dickson Street during the 17th annual Bikes, Blues & BBQ motorcycle rally in Fayetteville. Visit nwadg.com/photos to see more photographs from the rally.

NWA Democrat-Gazette/ANDY SHUPE
Riders make their way Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, along Dickson Street during the 17th annual Bikes, Blues & BBQ motorcycle rally in Fayetteville. Visit nwadg.com/photos to see more photographs from the rally.

Friday (9/22)

8 a.m.-7:30 p.m. — Baum Motorcycle Village open

8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. — CAF AirPower History Tour, Arkansas Air and Military Museum

9:30 a.m.-11:30 p.m. — A&M Railroad shuttle

11 a.m.-8 p.m. — Monster Experience, Arvest Ballpark

Noon-midnight — Washington County Fairgrounds Saloon open

2-11 p.m. — Dickson Street Beer Garden open

6 p.m. — Cruise on Dickson for car show

6:15 p.m. — “Bring the Heat” Whataburger Jalapeno Eating Contest, Pabst Blue Ribbon Stage on Dickson Street

6:30-8:30 p.m. — People’s Choice at the Arkansas State BBQ Championship, Washington County Fairgrounds. $10.

7 p.m. — Lawn mower pulls, Washington County Fairgrounds

8 p.m. — Miss BBB Qualifier, Blues Alley Saloon at the Washington County Fairgrounds


NWA Democrat-Gazette/ANDY SHUPE Riders make their way Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, along Dickson Street during the 17th annual Bikes, Blues & BBQ motorcycle rally in Fayetteville. Visit nwadg.com/photos to see more photographs from the rally.

NWA Democrat-Gazette/ANDY SHUPE
Riders make their way Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, along Dickson Street during the 17th annual Bikes, Blues & BBQ motorcycle rally in Fayetteville. Visit nwadg.com/photos to see more photographs from the rally.

Saturday (9/23)

7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. — Arkansas State BBQ Championship, Washington County Fairgrounds

8 a.m. — Car Show, Arvest Ballpark

8 a.m.-7:30 p.m. — Baum Motorcycle Village open

8 a.m.-11 p.m. — Dickson Street Beer Garden open

8:30 a.m.-12:30 a.m. — A&M Railroad shuttle

9 a.m. – 2 p.m. — Stokes Air “Battle of the Bikes” featuring Fetts Foley Band, Dickson Street. $20.

9 a.m.-5 p.m. — CAF AirPower History Tour, Arkansas Air and Military Museum

11 a.m.-8 p.m. — Monster Experience, Arvest Ballpark

Noon-midnight — Washington County Fairgrounds Saloon open

1 p.m. — Karaoke Wildcard Competition, Blues Alley Saloon at the Washington County Fairgrounds

3 p.m. — Karaoke Finals, Thompson Hall, Washington County Fairgrounds

3:30 p.m. — Parade of Power

7 p.m. — Lawn mower pulls, Washington County Fairgrounds

— Source: bikesbluesandbbq.org

Autumn Equinox On Horizon

STAFF PHOTO FLIP PUTTHOFF  RENOVATION READY Canada geese outnumbered people during a snowy day on Thursday Dec. 12 2013 at Lake Atalanta Park in Rogers. Concerned residents want to be involved with planning a renovation of the lake and park.

STAFF PHOTO FLIP PUTTHOFF
Canada geese Thursday Dec. 12 2013 at Lake Atalanta Park in Rogers. 

Season marked by colors, harvests and farewells

Our descent into winter’s darkness is contrarily marked by exuberant celebrations throughout nature. Trees explode into brilliant autumn colors and shower the sidewalks with a rainbow layer of fragrant leaves. Ripening orange pumpkins tempt us on their vines. White-tailed deer are entering their rut, running around the countryside to find or flee from their mates. Butterflies are still frolicking in the meadows, and even in death, decorate the ground with patterned wings. Autumn is a time to delight in life and death alike, with harvests made possible by both.

It’s also a season of struggle for some, like the hummingbirds. Don’t remove nectar feeders yet! There may not be much activity at your feeder, but starving migrants are in search of a meal, and yours could tip the scales in favor of survival. These cute aerial squeakers thank you in advance.

Wild Canada geese honk in rhythm as they fly past the countryside looking for rest stops on their way south. Geese migrants are exhausted and will be on their way once ready. Allow them some space and they provide the entertainment – even a special honking song for takeoff.

Author and Unitarian Universalist minister Robert Fulghum encourages leaf-raking procrastination in “All I Really Need to Know I Learned in Kindergarten.” Here’s what he says: “Mine is the only yard in the neighborhood with leaves … I like the way it looks. My wife does not. The gardening magazine does not like it, either. Leaves should be raked. There are rules … There is a reason for leaves. There is no reason for mowed grass. So say I.” Aesthetics and healthy soil can meet in the middle with mulch. Mulching leaves in a thin layer throughout the lawn allows them to sink into the ground faster and nourish it for next year.

Want to save some money on produce? Look into what kinds of wild edibles are near you this season. For example, wild persimmon is plumping on the branches right now, and it will be ready to eat once it turns purplish orange and either falls right off the branch into your sheet or comes off easily in the hand. The taste is like a sweet potato, but only when fully ripe. Maybe you’d like to plant trees like persimmon, paw-paw, mulberry or berry bushes for your family and wildlife alike as a longer-term investment.

Seed saving is taking on new meaning in this age of genetically modified (but still dispersed by nature) plants with patents owned by companies. If you garden or have a native plant patch for wildlife, save the seeds and you’ll save money by having to purchase fewer plants the following year. We’re also approaching the time to plant milkweed, so if that’s what you’ve been waiting for, get ready with those seeds!

Amanda Bancroft is a writer, artist, and naturalist building an off-grid cottage for land conservation on Kessler Mountain. She and her husband Ryan blog about their adventures and offer a solar-hosted online educational center on how to make a difference with everyday choices at www.RipplesBlog.org.

Delta Vs. Southwest Vs. Ozark BBQ

File Photo Brisket, pulled pork, ribs, sausage, cole slaw, baked beans and potato salad fill a plate at Ralph’s Pink Flamingo BBQ in Fort Smith.

File Photo
Brisket, pulled pork, ribs, sausage, cole slaw, baked beans and potato salad fill a plate at Ralph’s Pink Flamingo BBQ in Fort Smith.

Betwixt Memphis and Texarkana, Kansas City and parts beyond, Arkansas stands at a crossroads of magnificent barbecue styles. Here, within our different geographical and geological regions, a blend of thick and thin sauces, meats and preparations, the varieties blend like hickory and oak as their smoke fills the pit.

Arkansas once had its own portion of barbecue on the plate with the use of goat at heritage restaurants such as McClard’s Barbecue in Hot Springs and Craig Brothers in DeValls Bluff. But its barbecue heritage goes back even further. Public events where ditch smoking took place — the act of lining a freshly dug ditch with hot wood and rocks, placing meat to be smoked upon them and then burying the meat under more smoldering wood — were recorded in journals and newspapers of the early 19th century. Such a mention comes from Helena as far back as 1814, where a community gathering was advertised with the call for farmers to bring their pigs, turkeys, ducks, chickens and all to be smoked and shared.

With the homogenization of cuisine that spread through the state after World War II via the automobile and the availability of television, many of our barbecue traditions have disappeared — including smoked goat. What remains is our favorite barbecue condiment, coleslaw, which we slather on our pigmeat sandwiches and buns of beef equally.

While regional delicacies can be cited, Arkansas’s barbecue falls into three categories: Delta, Southwest, and Ozark.

Delta BBQ

The vast Mississippi River Alluvial Plain, once clear cut up to both sides of Crowley’s Ridge, has long been the land of cotton. Rice has become dominant over time, as have crops of wheat, corn and sorghum. Sharecropping and crop farming have long called for as much of the land to be used for crops as possible, leaving little space for the grazing of cattle. Here, barbecue was a matter of avian game, smaller wildlife and pigs. Smoking tends to be pit-style, similar to the ditch smoking of before but in concrete or brick bunkers.

The epitome of this style could easily be shown at the James Beard Award-winning Jones Barbecue Diner in Marianna, where Harold Jones has been smoking pork butts since 1964. The same smoky pork and its secret thin vinegar sauce have been made by members of the family since the Civil War. The meat is served one of three ways — on white bread with slaw, on white bread without slaw, and piled up into an aluminum-foil wrapped heap sold by the pound.

Similarly, the pigmeat sandwiches with their thin hot sauces of the Blytheville area fall into this category, whether with the finely chopped pork on a bun with a hot sauce at Kream Kastle or the granddaddy Dixie Pig (around since 1923) with its fiery pepper sauce served in ketchup bottles to douse your pile of hickory smoked meat.

Southwest BBQ

In reality, this type of barbecue spans two of Arkansas’s regions, the Ouachitas and what natives tend to call Lower Arkansas, a spread which rolls south from the Arkansas River Valley on the western side of the state, over Interstate 30 and on a Doppler-style sweep straight over to Bayou Bartholomew. It includes such vastly different places as Mena, Magnolia and Malvern. It is here that the Texas influence has been allowed to gnaw its way in.

Here, the barbecue is usually smoked in the pit directly over hardwoods such as hickory, oak and pecan (unlike Texas-style mesquite), with beef and chicken taking their places alongside pork ribs and butts. The sauce is thicker and sweeter. A prime example would be Stubby’s Hik’ry Pit Bar-B-Q in Hot Springs, which offers that variety of meats as well as a bean pot — a pot of beans that sits at the bottom of the pit catching juices falling off the meat while smoking.

Ozark BBQ

Thanks to the ridges and valleys of the Ozark plateau, this region remained mostly isolated until the second half of the 20th century. A culture of smokehouse cuisine developed, where hams, sausages and whole turkeys were salted and hung for days to cure in pecan and fruitwood enhanced smoke. Acclaimed purveyors of smoked meats (including the once dominant Ozark Mountain Smokehouse and its satellite locations) offered these succulent samples of savory morsels to tourists and diners alike.

While such smoked meats are still being prepared in the same fashion at the renowned Coursey’s Smoked Meats in St. Joe, it’s the purveyors of barbecue that have truly benefited from these flavors. Smoke plus thicker sauce (more reminiscent of Kansas City-style brown sugar sauces) tend to be more prevalent, as is evidenced in such places as Blacksheep Joe’s in Yellville.

There are other influences out there throughout the region, from Ralph’s Pink Flamingo in Fort Smith with its smoked sausage links; Rivertowne BBQ in Ozark with butter-soft smoked brisket; and the pit-smoked pork ribs and sandwiches at Bubba’s in Eureka Springs — but overall, smoke rules in the Ozarks.

— Kat Robinson

kat@tiedyetravels.com


FAQ

Arkansas BBQ Championship

People’s Choice Contest

WHEN — 6 p.m. Friday

WHERE — Washington County Fairgrounds in Fayetteville

COST — $10

INFO — bikesbluesandbbq.org

Bikes, Blues & BBQ

Vintage Pistol

Vintage Pistol

Festival stages vs. George’s stages

Blues music has become inextricably entwined with the fabric of motorcycle rallies across the country. Perhaps it’s because of the deep American roots the bikes and the blues both share. Whatever the reason, blues musicians — and their genre-crossing peers with elements of rock, country and bluegrass — will once again fill the weekend with free music for the annual Bikes, Blues & BBQ festival. Though other venues across Northwest Arkansas will host their share of musicians welcoming bikers, here are the three main stages closest to all the festival action: Dickson Street’s Pabst Blue Ribbon Stage in the Walton Arts Center parking lot, the Blues Alley Saloon at the Bikes, Blues & BBQ Campground at the Washington County Fairgrounds and, of course, the two stages at Arkansas’ oldest and longest-running live music venue, George’s Majestic Lounge on Dickson Street.

Pabst Blue Ribbon Stage

Dickson Street

Friday

3:30-4:30 p.m. – Leah & the Mojo Doctors

Quarter-finalists at the 2013 International Blues Festival — and 2012 Ozark Blues Challenge winners — Leah & the Mojo Doctors open the PBR Stage on Friday with their high-energy, award-winning presence.

5-6 p.m. – Vintage Pistol

6:30-8 p.m. – The Uncrowned Kings

The Uncrowned Kings bring together the leaders of four prominent Northwest Arkansas bands: Oreo Blue, Big Bad Bubba, Big’uns and the TJ Scarlett Band. The veteran, award-winning musicians form a musical collective deliver rock ‘n’ roll from the ’60s through the ’80s for your listening pleasure.

8:30-10 p.m. – Hot Lix

10:30 p.m.-midnight – Jason D. Williams

Friday’s headliner on the PBR Stage is the dynamic Jason D. Williams, who credits influences like Jerry Lee Lewis, Moon Mullican, Memphis Slim and Al Jolson as inspiration for his raw energy. Blending country, rock ‘n’ roll, rockabilly and more, Williams brings nothing if not a good time to the stage.

Jason D. Williams

Jason D. Williams

Saturday

2-4 p.m. – Mister Lucky

4:30-6 p.m. – Divas On Fire

6:30-8 p.m. – Arkansauce

The four-piece, hometown, “newgrass” favorites Arkansauce released their third album “If I Were You” in April and bring their hard-driving sound to the PBR Stage on Saturday night. Powerful harmonies and heart-felt songwriting, all held together by deep foot-stompin’ bass grooves, define many an Arkansauce performance.

8:30-10 p.m. – The Mixtapes

10:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. – Dead Metal Society

Members of well-known Tulsa bands combine to relive the glory days of ’80s metal bands — the smokin’ solos, screeching vocals, booming drums and all the bombastic beauty that has been forgotten in today’s rock.

Blues Alley Saloon

Bikes Blues & BBQ Campground

Friday

6 p.m.-midnight – Boston Mountain Playboys

Saturday

5:30-8:30 p.m. – Brody Buster

9 p.m.-midnight – Dr. NOLA and the Soul Shakers

George’s Majestic Lounge

on Dickson Street

Friday

Lounge Stage

Noon — Gary Hutchison

3 p.m. — Arkansauce

6 p.m. — Boss Tweeds

8 p.m. — Lucas Parker​

Garden Stage

6:30 p.m. — Oreo Blue

10 p.m. — Mountain Sprout

10:30 p.m. — Vintage Pistol

12:30 a.m. — Groovement

Saturday

Lounge Stage

noon — Gary Hutchison

3 p.m. — Lucas Parker

6 p.m. — Vintage Pistol

The five-piece rock outfit is staying vintage and true to the sounds of the psychedelic, roots and rock giants that came before them.

8 p.m. — Groovement

11 p.m. — Arkansauce

​​Garden Stage

TBD — Jason D. Williams

10 p.m. — Mountain Sprout

Mountain Sprout has the look of wild all over them — in their long beards, the smoking and drinking while they play and on-stage attitudes. The group plays wild and loose too, sawing fiddles or trashing banjos in their songs full of fervor and humor.

— Jocelyn Murphy

jmurphy@nwadg.com

8 Days A Week

THURSDAY (9/21)

“The Rocky Horror Show” — With Michael Myers, Caity Church, Jeremy Reid Stuthard, Anna Knight, Cody Robinson & Matt Peoples, 8 p.m. today-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, Arkansas Public Theatre in Rogers. $23-$35. 631-8988.

“The Rocky Horror Show” — With Michael Myers, Caity Church, Jeremy Reid Stuthard, Anna Knight, Cody Robinson & Matt Peoples, 8 p.m. today-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, Arkansas Public Theatre in Rogers. $23-$35. 631-8988.

Sunset Kayak Tour — With recreational kayaks, paddles and lifejackets provided, 5:15 p.m., Hobbs State Park near Rogers. $6-$12. Register at 789-5000.

Arkansas Living Treasure Artists — A film screening, 6 p.m., Eureka Springs School of the Arts, just west of Lake Leatherwood City Park in Eureka Springs. A Q&A with the artists will follow. Reservations at 253-5384.

Giving Voice: A Festival of Writing and the Arts — With graphic novelist and comic book author Gene Luen Yang, 6:30 p.m., Cathedral of the Ozarks at John Brown University in Siloam Springs. $5. Email tthomas@jbu.edu.

“The Rocky Horror Show” — With Michael Myers, Caity Church, Jeremy Reid Stuthard, Anna Knight, Cody Robinson & Matt Peoples, 8 p.m. today-Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, Arkansas Public Theatre in Rogers. $23-$35. 631-8988.

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FRIDAY (9/22)

Last Day — For “A New Subjectivity: Figurative Painting after 2000,” exhibition featuring six female painters exploring diverse aspects of figuration within their painting, Fine Arts Center Gallery at the University of Arkansas. Free. 575-7987.

Sunset Dinner Cruise — With a dinner served at Ventris Trails End Resort, 4 p.m., Rocky Branch Marina near Rogers. Hosted by Hobbs State Park. $40. Register at 789-5000.

Poetry Slam Fundraiser — With dinner, birthday cake and slam poetry, 5:30 p.m., The Cookery in Eureka Springs. Benefits the Writers’ Colony at Dairy Hollow. $50. 253-7444.

Craft Squared — Meditation Art with Matt Miller, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Crystal Bridges Museum. $55. 657-2335.

__

Art in the Park — A fine art festival hosted by the Artists of Northwest Arkansas, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Dave Peel Park, 206 W. Central Ave. in Bentonville. Admission is free. artistsnwarkansas.org.

Art in the Park — A fine art festival hosted by the Artists of Northwest Arkansas, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Dave Peel Park, 206 W. Central Ave. in Bentonville. Admission is free. artistsnwarkansas.org.

SATURDAY (9/23)

Country Breakfast — Hosted by the Wedington Volunteer Fire Department, 6-11 a.m., 13496 Arkansas 16 west in Fayetteville. $2-$6. Email ehenderson@pgtc.com.

Art in the Park — A fine art festival hosted by the Artists of Northwest Arkansas, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Dave Peel Park, 206 W. Central Ave. in Bentonville. Admission is free. artistsnwarkansas.org.

Ozark Wireless Society — 10 a.m., Shiloh Museum of Ozark History in downtown Springdale. 750-8165 or shilohmuseum.org.

Super Saturday — Cowboy musician Marshall Mitchell, 10:30 a.m., Fayetteville Public Library. For families. faylib.org.

Ocarina Workshop — Make a clay whistle, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Ozark Folkways in Winslow. $15. Ages 12 & older. ozarkfolkways.org.

Astronomy Day — With the Sugar Creek Astronomical Society & the Photographic Society of NWA, 6 p.m., Hobbs State Park near Rogers. Free. 789-5000.

Astronomy Day — With the Sugar Creek Astronomical Society & the Photographic Society of NWA, 6 p.m. Saturday, Hobbs State Park near Rogers. Free. 789-5000.

Astronomy Day — With the Sugar Creek Astronomical Society & the Photographic Society of NWA, 6 p.m. Saturday, Hobbs State Park near Rogers. Free. 789-5000.

Acrobats of China — From Branson, 7 p.m., ArcBest Corp. Performing Arts Center in Fort Smith. $20-$55. 800-965-9324.

__

SUNDAY (9/24)

Long Distance Hiking — With Jim Warnock, a “through hiker,” 2 p.m., Hobbs State Park near Rogers. Free. 789-5000.

Sunset Kayak Tour — With recreational kayaks, paddles and lifejackets provided, 5:15 p.m., Hobbs State Park near Rogers. $6-$12. Register at 789-5000.

__

MONDAY (9/25)

__

TUESDAY (9/26)

Ozark Poets & Writers Collective — With novelist Mara Cohen Ioannides, author of “We Are in Exile,” 7 p.m., Nightbird Books in Fayetteville. Open mic before & after Ioannides. Email benspollock@gmail.com.

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WEDNESDAY (9/27)

Let’s LEGO — 4 p.m., Bentonville Public Library. For elementary and middle-schoolers. 271-6816.

__

THURSDAY (9/28)

Last Day — For works by Carlos Luna, combining aspects of Cuban, Mexican and American cultures to create a new language, Fort Smith Regional Art Museum. 784-2787 or fsram.org.

Artinfusion Insight Happy Hour — Autumn Equinox in “Chihuly: In the Forest,” 5:30-7 p.m., Crystal Bridges Museum. Free for Artinfusion members. 657-2335.

DISH — With Case Dighero, 6-7:30 p.m., Crystal Bridges Museum. $40. 657-2335.

Film Series — Hollywood Jazz: “The Jazz Singer,” 7 p.m., Crystal Bridges Museum. Free. 657-2335.

Civil War Roundtable — 7 p.m., Shiloh Museum of Ozark History in downtown Springdale. 750-8165 or shilohmuseum.org.

__

SEPT. 29

Art By The Glass — Jazzed, inspired by “Stuart Davis: In Full Swing,” 6:30-8:30 p.m., Crystal Bridges Museum. $55. 658-2335.

Spotlight Talk — With art historian Richard Ormond speaking on John Singer Sargent, 7 p.m., Crystal Bridges Museum. Free. 657-2335.

Sock Hop — With the Rockin’ Roads Band, 7-9:30 p.m., Riordan Hall in Bella Vista. $10 at the library during regular business hours. 855-1753.

__

SEPT. 30

Artist Reception — For jewelry artist Terri Logan, noon-6 p.m., Zarks Gallery, 67 Spring St. in Eureka Springs. Previously owned jewelry can be brought to the gallery to be donated to the Doggie Shop Fashion Show, benefiting the Good Shephard Humane Society. Free. 253-2626 or zarksgallery.com.

Playing With Fire — The ancient art of raku pottery, 3-7 p.m., Ozark Folkways in Winslow. $15. Ages 18 & older. ozarkfolkways.org.

— Becca Martin-Brown

bmartin@nwadg.com

On A Roll

Rally grows up to be regional event

STACY RYBURN

sryburn@nwadg.com

NWA Democrat-Gazette/CHARLIE KAIJO Colton Williams and Elijah Williams, 5, of Fayetteville walk through rows of motorcycles at Pig Trail Harley-Davidson in Rogers, AR on Saturday, September 16, 2017. Pig Trail Harley-Davidson in Rogers has had their own event during Bikes and Blues for a decade now. They are bringing in an extra 100 employees for the event Frank Hardman, general sales manager, said. In addition, he said they expect to sale about 200 motorcycles through the event.

NWA Democrat-Gazette/CHARLIE KAIJO Colton Williams and Elijah Williams, 5, of Fayetteville walk through rows of motorcycles at Pig Trail Harley-Davidson Saturday, September 16, 2017 in Rogers. 

Throttle jockeys can get the Bikes, Blues & BBQ experience without ever running tread on Dickson Street.

What started in 2000 as a gathering of a few hundred riders to benefit Meals on Wheels has blossomed into a sprawling, thunderous regional event. Organizers quickly realized they needed to spread the traffic burden from the main drag downtown and in 2002 started strategically placing road barriers and tents. The festival has grown exponentially ever since.

Exhibitions have gone up at Baum Stadium, and campers have settled in at the Washington County Fairgrounds for about a decade. Arvest Ballpark in Springdale became a satellite venue in 2014 with car and motorcycle shows and barbecue cook-offs. It marked the first officially sanctioned venue outside of Fayetteville and has grown from a two-day affair to all four days of this year’s festival.

Pig Trail Harley-Davidson in Rogers has had its own mini-rally outside the store since 2007. A new addition this year, Bikes on the Bricks, will offer riders a chiller vibe, courtesy of the Rogers Downtown Partners.

Eureka Springs, already known as a tourist destination, has become a second home of sorts to the rally because of its scenic rides and lodging. Riders frequently book a year in advance.

The regulars got savvy about the experience, said Mike Maloney, executive director of the Eureka Springs Advertising and Promotion Commission.

“Let’s put it this way: Not everybody will ride up and down Dickson Street because there are so many motorcycles,” he said. “But for a lot of people that’s an OK thing.”

Fayetteville officials are OK with it, too. The rally’s regional reach doesn’t take away from the city’s piece of the proverbial pie, because with an estimated 325,000 to 350,000 participants, there’s plenty of pie to go around.

Shiloh struttin’

The natural progression of the rally lent itself to expand north, said Tommy Sisemore, executive director. With Pig Trail in Rogers and the festival’s main hub in Fayetteville, Arvest Ballpark right in between seemed like a perfect fit, he said.

New attractions this year in Springdale include a demo truck with all the latest and greatest Harley-Davidson models available for test ride. The Full Throttle Stunt Riders on Friday and Saturday will put on a high-energy show. Of course, the car show will be there. The latest models from Everett Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram Fiat will be, too. Snap-On will have tools on display to go with the motorcycles.

In Fayetteville, participants usually grab a turkey leg and meander about. In Springdale, they’ll be able to sit down, like in a restaurant, and have a pulled pork sandwich. And beer sales will be available throughout the rally this year, just like the beer gardens in Fayetteville.

The idea wasn’t to expand for the sake of it but to cultivate a partnership that made sense, Sisemore said.

“We’re going to continue to try to grow and cultivate Springdale and push people downtown now that they’ve started the downtown revitalization program,” he said. “They’ve got some great entertainment spots at bars and some nightlife.”

Springdale Mayor Doug Sprouse said he’s heard residents talking about organizing a ride through the city. Construction might prevent that now, but that won’t be the case in a year or two, he said.

“I can see it being a real attractive place for some expansion of Bikes and Blues events,” Sprouse said. The Springdale City Council unanimously voted in August to recognize Bikes, Blues & BBQ as a city-approved special event.

Roger, Rogers

The Pig Trail rally on Hudson Road is independent from Bikes & Blues, although the store serves as a sponsor. Sixty to 75 vendors sell food, T-shirts, merchandise and leather goods. About 400 motorcycles will be on display for sale.

Mike Hall, who works in marketing for Pig Trail, estimated 25,000 to 35,000 riders attend during peak times on Friday and Saturday, although it’s hard to know for sure. Heritage Indian Motorcycle of Northwest Arkansas is just down the street.

“It just keeps getting more and more and more,” he said. “We’re to the point now where we rent out any available space around us to use for parking just to handle the volume of traffic we have during the rally here.”

A few miles away, downtown Rogers will have its first bikes-themed event. The local merchants association, Rogers Downtown Partners, coordinated with rally officials, but it’s not an official rally event, said Julie Loose, a board member.

“We just wanted, with the area tourists and the motorcyclists here in town, to offer them something they can’t possibly get in Fayetteville, which is more of just a laid back setting,” she said. “We have a beautiful historic downtown, and we’ve got everything they want.”

An organized ride was scheduled for this morning, starting in Fayetteville and heading to Rogers for lunch. From there, the group will head to Eureka Springs for some shopping.

Perhaps most notably, Ozark Vintage Motorcycle Association will have its vintage motorcycle show at Frisco Park. It has been at Arvest Ballpark.

Pieces of the pie

It got harder for riders to find lodging about year five or six of the rally, once crowds swelled to more than 100,000. That’s when Eureka Springs saw a boom, Maloney said.

“They found if they rode not too far to the east, about 45 minutes away, they had a whole town at their disposal,” he said. “They had plenty of lodging, Monday through Friday, which was hard to find in the [NWA] corridor.”

Maloney estimated 10,000 riders come into Eureka Springs every year although the city isn’t directly associated with the festival. The riders serve as a huge economic asset with money spent on dining, lodging and refueling, he said.

“I equate Bikes, Blues & BBQ as ground zero in the eye of the hurricane, and we get the bands of wind and everything else that goes along with Bikes, Blues & BBQ in Eureka Springs,” he said. “It’s like dropping a rock in the middle of a pond, but we get the big, big ripples.”

Sisemore said the crowds the last few years in Fayetteville haven’t waned with rally-goers staying in Eureka Springs or hanging out in Rogers.

“Rather than try to keep everybody condensed down into one area, it makes more sense to be able to spread it out to the outlying areas,” he said. “Bikes, Blues & BBQ is definitely a regional rally.”

Better with age

Over the years the rally has gained new venues in Fayetteville and unofficial ones in other Northwest Arkansas spots, which means it’s attracting more and more people, said Steve Clark, president of the Fayetteville Chamber of Commerce. From the city’s perspective, that’s a good thing.

The charitable beneficiaries of the rally are regional entities, so it makes sense the region would come together during the rally, Clark said. The $200,000 commitment over 10 years the rally made last year to Arkansas Children’s Northwest Hospital in Springdale is something everyone will benefit from, Clark used as an example.

The rally bills itself as the country’s top charity rally. It has donated more than $1.5 million since 2000, according to organizers. Last year’s beneficiaries included 7 Hills Homeless Center, Habitat for Humanity and the Northwest Arkansas Center for Sexual Assault.

More attention regionally means more attention nationally, which can translate into more economic opportunities for the city, Clark said. Tourists, businesses or organizations that might not otherwise hear about Fayetteville will as the rally’s scope grows, he said.

“It’s all good, and it’s only getting better,” Clark said.

Bikes, Blues & BBQ Harley Vs. Indian

A photographer asked Sturgis motorcycle rally Grand Marshal Jessi Combs to pose for a photo standing next to her Harley-Davidson motorcycle, The Rapid City Journal reported on Aug. 12.

Combs, however, balked when she realized the photo would be taken in front of a semitrailer that carried the huge image of an Indian Motorcycle — suddenly the biggest competitor for cycle dominance at the Sturgis rally.

Combs’ reluctance to be seen in the same frame with a brand of motorcycle other than a Harley-Davidson underscores the renewed rivalry between two iconic American motorcycle brands.

We asked two Northwest Arkansas riders to compare and contrast their experiences.


Courtesy Photo Michael Riha poses with his 2001 American Ironhorse Tejas, the predecessor to his current Harley Softail.

Courtesy Photo
Michael Riha poses with his 2001 American Ironhorse Tejas, the predecessor to his current Harley Softail.

Michael Riha

UA Theatre Department Chairman

Harley-Davidson

Q. When and where did you start riding a motorcycle?

A. I began riding as a teenager. My first bike was a Honda MB-5. It was a 50 CC motorcycle that was a blast to ride, and I got it brand new with money I saved from my paper route and my job at McDonald’s. It was tiny, but it was able to go 50 miles per hour (with a good tail wind!)

I loved the sense of adventure it provided me — that and a sense of isolation. I was able to go out on the county roads where there was little traffic (I lived in Wisconsin) and enjoy just being in the wind. Even at a young age it provided me with a great sense of freedom and time for self-reflection.

Q. How did you fit the stereotype of bikers in that place and time?

A. Well, as far as “stereotypes,” I don’t think I did. I was a skinny teenager when I began. Upon selling the bike when I went to college, I didn’t have a bike again until grad school. That was an old Kawasaki 350 that burned as much oil as it did gas. I loved it, though. It was mine and it, once again, provided me time to get away from my studies (theater design) and center my thoughts without being distracted. I sold it when I took the job here at [the University of ] Arkansas. Seven years after being here I got the itch to get another bike. I stuck with a Honda and rode that for three years. I then upgraded to a custom chopper (American Ironhorse Tejas) that was truly the most amazing piece of machinery I’ve ever ridden. In 2008, I traded it in for my first Harley — a 2008 Softail — Crossbones that I still ride today. I’ve taken that bike on trips to Wisconsin to the 2008 110th Anniversary of Harley Davidson Party. I was able to see the Foo Fighters and Joan Jett. Both were fantastic concerts.

Q. How do you fit the stereotype now?

A. I don’t really believe there is a “stereotype.” If there is, I think I do fit it — middle aged, financially stable, white collar, dude (or dudette!) with a passion for freedom and escape.

Q. Why do you choose a Harley?

I guess I don’t really know other than the fact that I love the look, sound and style of most Harley-Davidson bikes. I don’t think it is the ONLY bike I would ride, but it certainly is at the top of the list.

Q. What will you be doing during Bikes, Blues & BBQ?

A. Well, since it usually happens during one of our tech weeks — or a run of a show! — I am at work most of the time the rally is happening. One thing I absolutely will not miss are the turkey legs! That is a tradition and a must have for me. The rest of the food, I can leave, but I have to get my turkey legs! I also do enjoy some of the blues acts that play in the beer garden. Oh, people watching! That has to be a favorite pastime as well. Some of the outfits are beyond description and should, in and of themselves, be considered works of art — or not.

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The Free Weekly/CHARLIE KAIJO Jim Hiland, far right, is president of the local Heritage Indian Motorcycle club.

The Free Weekly/CHARLIE KAIJO
Jim Hiland, far right, is president of the local Heritage Indian Motorcycle club.

Jim Hilan

U.S. Navy (Ret.)

Indian

Q. When and where did you start riding a motorcycle?

A. Immediately after high school, I joined the Navy. One of my first purchases was a Honda CB250. As a young sailor, I really enjoyed riding, and I always preferred being on two wheels versus four.

My introduction to riding lasted approximately four years. Along with my 250 I also rode larger displacement Hondas and I cared for and rode my uncle’s Kawasaki while he was serving in Vietnam.

Other interests overtook riding and that was pretty much it until I purchased my 2015 Indian Chieftain. While I had a brief experience with a BMW motorcycle (nice bike) I didn’t ride it much and sold it after a few years of owning it.

Q. How did you fit the stereotype of bikers in that place and time?

A. Since I wasn’t really a rider I didn’t have any rock-solid stereotypes of bikers. Over the years I’ve seen riders that seem a bit harsh and riders that that appeared to share similar interests and values as me. I think you would see this with any large “interest” group. In terms of a stereotype I would say is the main thought that comes to mind is that bikers have always seemed to be passionate about their sport.

Q. How do you fit the stereotype now?

A. It didn’t take long for me to see that motorcycling tends to be one of the great levelers in our society. When it comes to riding It doesn’t matter if you are the CEO of a large company or a young person just starting out in life. When riders get together, it’s really the shared passion for the ride that matters.

While there are many fine motorcycles from many companies I can best speak for the stereotype I have formed for the typical Indian Motorcycle rider. The single word I would use to describe the stereotype of this rider is “family.” It may sound a bit like a cliche, but our local Indian motorcycle riders’ community really is a family. It starts with a dealership staff that’s friendly and supportive. Many of us go to the dealership to just hang out to talk about the latest news from Indian.

We have an active and growing Indian Motorcycle Riders Group, and members enjoy the fellowship that comes with group rides or other social activities. When I purchased my bike I didn’t realize that, over time, the friendships and fellowship that comes with being part of this community would be as important to me as the ride.

Q. Why do you choose a Indian?

A. It turns out the Indian brand was an ideal fit for me. I always liked the heritage and look of Indian Motorcycles. For some reason, Indian Motorcycles touched me in a way that other brands didn’t.

In 2014 Indian Motorcycle launched a whole new model lineup of bikes. When I saw that an Indian dealership popped up in Rogers, I couldn’t resist checking it out. A few steps into the dealership and I knew that I was going to leave with a bike.

Since I had been away from riding for over 30 years and had never been on a large cruiser, I was initially a bit apprehensive. While it’s a bit humorous at this point, I actually let the general manager of the dealership know that I wouldn’t feel comfortable purchasing the bike unless he delivered it to my house. I wanted to get comfortable riding it on my neighborhood streets.

I’m really glad he delivered that bike to me! In less than three years of owning my Chieftain I have logged almost 50,000 miles and have traveled through 25 states. Needless to say, this was a purchase that has changed the entire course of my life!

Q. What will you be doing during Bikes, Blues &BBQ?

A. As I said earlier, Heritage Indian is a great place to just hang out. Our Rider’s Group has planned a very nice ride on Thursday of the rally. Before and after that ride you may very well find me at Heritage Indian chatting with rally goers or members of my Indian motorcycle family about what else — our bikes and the next ride or social event!

— Becca Martin-Brown

bmartin@nwadg.com