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Harvest Fest Celebrates Food, Farmers, Chefs

File Photo /J.T. WAMPLER Chef Chrissy Sanderson, left, of Fayetteville’s Mockingbird Kitchen, seen here with chef Joshua Walters of Bentonville’s MOD Restaurant & Social during the Roots Festival Chef Cookoff 2017 at the Fayetteville Farmers’ Market, is one of four local chefs performing cooking demonstrations at the market Saturday from 9 a.m. until noon.

File Photo /J.T. WAMPLER
Chef Chrissy Sanderson, left, of Fayetteville’s Mockingbird Kitchen, seen here with chef Joshua Walters of Bentonville’s MOD Restaurant & Social during the Roots Festival Chef Cookoff 2017 at the Fayetteville Farmers’ Market, is one of four local chefs performing cooking demonstrations at the market Saturday from 9 a.m. until noon.

The Fayetteville Farmers’ Market’s “Harvest Fest” on Saturday promises to be a big celebration of local chefs, local food and local farmers, says FFM business coordinator Leann Halsey.

“This is a great chance for people to engage with their local community and support and celebrate our local farmers,” Halsey says of the event, scheduled to run from 9 a.m. until noon. The festival is the culmination of a two-year USDA grant that allowed the market to host local chefs for cooking demonstrations.

“These are chefs that have also supported the Farmers’ Market by purchasing local foods,” Halsey explains. “This grant was to help teach people about the local foods that are available to them.” Halsey says chefs from Ozark Natural Foods, Mockingbird, The Farmer’s Table and South in the Mouth will be on the square, cooking recipes using locally sourced ingredients. Observers can take home copies of the recipes to try in their own kitchens.

“Several local nonprofits will also be present, conducting workshops that will focus on activities that are relative their their own particular organizations,” says Halsey. Those organizations include Feed Communities, Seeds That Feed, Tri Cycle Farms, the Walton Arts Center, Washington County Master Gardeners, Washington County SNAP-Ed, Ozark River Stewards, Ozark Slow Foods and FoodCorps Arkansas.

Halsey says live entertainment will also be offered, as well as a jam and jelly tasting featuring local producers from the Farmers’ Market.

“It’s just a wonderful chance for folks to taste products from local sources,” says Halsey.

— Lara Hightower

lhightower@nwadg.com

The Point Of Crisis

Central High remembered 60 years later

A visit to the Little Rock Central High School National Historic Site Visitor Center may make you hopeful, ashamed or even angry — but most of all, it will make you think.

 

Photo courtesy Kat Robinson

Photo courtesy Kat Robinson

The events of September 1957 are being remembered this month on the 60th anniversary of the integration of Little Rock’s prestigious high school — but the forces that surrounded the actions of that month bear remembering, as well as the repercussions that followed. Catty-corner from Central High — which is still in full operation — stands a National Parks Visitor Center for those who come to learn about what happened here.

The two facilities have a separation of time and purpose. Within the school, students are preparing for their future, while at the center, others are focusing on the past.

It’s not a glorious one, not in this respect. In 1927, the federal government gave the city of Little Rock $1.5 million (equivalent to more than $20 million today) to build two new high schools in the name of separate-but-equal. It went into the creation and construction of a massive, six-story block-long edifice for white students that was considered on completion to be “the most beautiful high school in America” by the American Institution of Architects. Nothing was left for black students, so the black community of Little Rock banded together and raised money with bake sales, lawn mowing and other work to match monies granted by the Rosenfeld Fund. The $400,000 raised went to create Dunbar High School, named for black poet Paul Lancaster Dunbar, built on plans by the same architect that designed Central’s imposing structure.

The National Historic Site’s Visitors Center notes this history and the conditions of the separate-but-equal buildup following Plessy Vs. Ferguson, the landmark case that called for separate facilities to be provided for white and black Americans. It also covers the 1954 U.S. Supreme Court decision to end that practice, declaring segregation in public schools unconstitutional; how Little Rock’s school board held firm against that decision and the later admonition that integration happen “with all deliberate speed”; and the incredible standards the first black students to apply were held to before they could cross the threshold at Central High.

Photo courtesy Kat Robinson

Photo courtesy Kat Robinson

History books in schools often mention the 1957 Central High School desegregation crisis, but few delve into the rigors these students were required to meet before even being considered — perfect grades, perfect attendance. They wouldn’t be allowed to participate in athletics, and they would not be allowed to fight back against anything done to them. Despite the restrictions, 200 students applied for the first class. Some dropped out of the process because of the restrictions; others removed themselves over threats called to their homes or places of business. In the end, 10 students were allowed to attend.

They met a street full of vitriol that morning of Sept. 4. After Gov. Orval Faubus called for the Arkansas National Guard to “accomplish the mission of maintaining or restoring law and order and to preserve the peace, health, safety and security of the citizens of Pulaski County, Arkansas” on Labor Day, a decision was made not to send these students to Central the next day. That Tuesday night, each of the 10 students was called to meet at the home of Daisy Bates — the president of Arkansas’s NAACP at the time. However, the family of Elizabeth Eckford did not get the message. They had no phone.

This is where the tour takes you from the visitors center out to the street, where an interpreter waves toward the different parts of the street — the direction Eckford came from after stepping off a bus a few blocks away, the section where a crowd of more than 1,000 angry white men and women would stand in the street, the line where National Guardsmen created a human barrier. A brief stop is made at the tiny white gas station — restored to its appearance in 1957 — where members of the media lined up and waited for hours to voice their copy to their news outlets over the only public telephone nearby. The interpreter shares how nine students were escorted by Bates, two white ministers and two black preachers up to the school, where a National Guardsman told them they could not enter — and how one of the nine in that group, a 10th grader named Jane Hill, would not try again.

The tour continues down the sidewalk in front of the school as the interpreter lays out the path of Elizabeth Eckford, who instead of turning when she saw the crowd, walked into it, getting spit upon and jeered. When she reached the barrier formed by the Guardsmen and was turned away, how she proceeded through the crowd, how a reporter from the New York Times would sit with her as she waited on a city bus and how he’d lose his job for that action, how a woman named Grace Loach would stand up to the crowd and be jeered for it.

During the summer and on some school days, the tour proceeds inside. No photos are to be taken for the sake of the privacy of the school’s nearly 2,500 students. A stop is made in the vestibule at the top of the entry stairs, where a case displays the photographs and some of the personal effects of the Little Rock Nine.

Then the tour is escorted into the auditorium, where in the front right section the interpreter talks about what happened next — how on Sept. 22, the nine remaining students were escorted in a side door

by police, how word got around that they were inside and the crowd that formed, and how they were taken out the back door and driven out in the floorboards of cars. President Dwight D. Eisenhower, frustrated with Arkansas’s governor, federalized the National Guard and sent in the army to ensure safe entrance for the nine on Sept. 25, 1957.

That’s where the story ended in media coverage — but the tour picks up. The interpreter talks about life inside the school for these students — a horrific tale of bullying, the blind eyes of administrators and the outright cruelty of classmates. The rules clearly stated the black students could not reciprocate, and they didn’t.

More is shared, including the vote the following year that resulted in the closing of four Little Rock high schools — including Central — for the duration of the 1958 school year. And then the following year, when the oldest of the Little Rock Nine managed to complete coursework for graduation. He was offered only a few tickets for graduation, but one of those who attended on his behalf was none other than Martin Luther King Jr.

The tour progresses outside and across the street to a special, newly constructed park, where tour members are given the chance to answer questions and to reflect on what happened at the school.

KAT ROBINSON

kat@tiedyetravels.com

Kat Robinson is an Arkansas food historian and travel writer based in Little Rock. Follow her adventures at TieDyeTravels.com.

Rooted In Enjoyment

KISS’ Paul Stanley also visual artist, proud dad

BECCA MARTIN-BROWN

bmartin@nwadg.com

Courtesy Photo Paul Stanley, vocalist and guitarist for the iconic band KISS, is also an actor, an artist and a very proud dad.

Courtesy Photo
Paul Stanley, vocalist and guitarist for the iconic band KISS, is also an actor, an artist and a very proud dad.

The math says Paul Stanley is 65 years old.

KISS, the iconic band he formed with Gene Simmons, is 44 and has sold 75 million records worldwide, filled countless arenas, played at the Olympics and the Super Bowl and was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2014.

It’s difficult to reconcile that age or that onstage persona with the Paul Stanley on the phone from his West Coast home. That man is thoughtful, soft-spoken, humble, articulate and was willing to stop what he was doing for an interview.

What he was doing was painting — not the house, he says with a chuckle, but large-scale brightly colored acrylics which have become desired and collectible in their own right.

“I’ve always defined myself by the avenues and the routes I find to express myself,” Stanley says. “I find that any outlet for creativity is to find another part of myself and acquaint myself with another piece of the puzzle.”

There’s another smile in his voice when Stanley says it was “impossible for me to be a starving artist,” but “like most things in my life, I’ve never really gotten into any outlet for anybody else’s benefit except mine. I’ve found that if I stay true to my own likes and dislikes, it finds an audience. KISS was the band we never saw, something we wanted to see. My art and everything else I’ve done has been a quest of mine to find enjoyment, and painting was the same.”

Stanley adds he “never expected to show anyone my work, and yet when people came over to the house and saw pieces on the wall, they asked me who did them. I was so self-conscious, I didn’t sign them.” The works still hang unsigned, he says, to remind him of those humble beginnings. “I like introducing people to art or aspects of the arts they haven’t been familiar with or have been too intimidated to enjoy,” he says. “Not enough people appreciate art because critics tell them their opinion isn’t valid unless they’ve been educated. I tell people good art is what you like, and bad art is what you don’t like. In my art shows, I always try to get people to understand what hits them emotionally or viscerally is valid.”

Stanley says he grew up in a home where “the arts were very important” and “part of everyday life.”

“My parents were European,” he says, “and they had a different mindset. Going to a classical concert, going to museums, was as normal as going to a baseball game [is for many people]. When I lived in New York [as an adult], I made a run to see live theater once a week if I could.”

Kiss

Kiss

Less dedicated fans of KISS might also be surprised to know that Stanley played the lead in a production of “The Phantom of the Opera,” going through the whole audition process. “The last thing they needed was Bozo the Clown ruining a billion dollar franchise.” It was fulfillment of a dream for him, he says, but also another effort to make an art accessible. “Ultimately it was a way for people to experience theater who might have been too intimidated to go [otherwise]. Theater started in the street. It’s not something just for the upper class.”

Stanley’s primary passions remain performing — “there’s no substitute for passion,” he says of the continued stature of KISS — and his family. He has a 23-year-old son, Evan, from a previous marriage and shares three children — Colin, 11, Sarah, 8, and Emily, 6, with wife Erin.

The eldest, a graduate of the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University, “is really an amazing young man,” Stanley says, “who additionally happens to be a musician, a great writer, very charismatic on stage, a terrific guitar player. He’s one of those great accomplishments in my life. Really, without trying to sound overly sentimental, the fact of the matter is when we leave this earth, all that matters is what we leave behind.

“Hopefully what we find as we travel life’s path is that everything great is made possible by the roots that you plant. And nothing is more stabilizing than family.”


FAQ

KISS in Concert

WHEN — Gates open at 6 p.m. today; music at 7:30 p.m.

WHERE — Walmart Arkansas Music Pavilion in Rogers

COST — $55.50 & up

INFO — arkansasmusicpavilion.com

How Loud Is Too Loud?

Commission requests sound-muffling measures

STACY RYBURN

sryburn@nwadg.com

NWA Democrat-Gazette/J.T. WAMPLER Customers have lunch at JJ’s Beer Garden and Brewing Co. in Fayetteville. The business recently applied for a change to its existing permit with the city that would allow the venue to have 18 additional concerts a year.

NWA Democrat-Gazette/J.T. WAMPLER
Customers have lunch at JJ’s Beer Garden and Brewing Co. in Fayetteville. The business recently applied for a change to its existing permit with the city that would allow the venue to have 18 additional concerts a year.

Plans by a recently opened restaurant and music venue to expand hours and shows have drawn the ire of several residents living nearby — and a reprimand from planning commissioners.

JJ’s Beer Garden and Brewing Co., which opened this summer at 3615 N. Steele Blvd., regularly has hosted free concerts on Thursday evenings. Planning commissioners in December 2015 granted the restaurant a permit to have music one night a week from 6-9 p.m.

On Sept. 11, the commission considered changes to the permit that would give JJ’s 18 concert dates in addition to the Thursday shows and allow music until 11 p.m. Commissioners tabled the request 6-0 until the next meeting. Then, in a special meeting Sept. 14, the Planning Commission voted 7-0 to let the restaurant and music venue host a charity event with music Sept. 17 for First Tee of Northwest Arkansas.

Commissioner Sloan Scroggin said he likes everything about the place except for what’s happened with the music. He encouraged owner Jody Thornton to work with the neighbors. Thornton apologized for not bringing up the event earlier, adding he thought his request would get approval.

At the Sept. 11 meeting, Jonathan Curth, city planner, said his staff has received numerous complaints about the establishment from residents who live in a subdivision just to the southwest. Complaints focused largely on the noise coming from the outdoor stage area during concerts and soundchecks.

Thornton said he didn’t know how popular the place would get when he first applied for the music permit. Average attendance has been about 1,600 patrons, with shows as high as 2,500, he said.

The restriction of having music only on Thursdays has made booking acts difficult, and the venue has had to turn away charitable organizations wanting to have benefits there, Thornton said. Potential customers from regional cities have trouble making it to shows with enough time to enjoy them before they end, he said.

Thornton said he likely will come back to the commission next year after studying ways to take care of the sound situation. Commissioners suggested Thornton look into building a wall or placing vegetation outside that would mitigate the sound.

Bikes, Blues & BBQ Schedule

NWA Democrat-Gazette/ANDY SHUPE Riders make their way down Dickson Street Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, during the 17th annual Bikes, Blues & BBQ motorcycle rally in Fayetteville. Visit nwadg.com/photos to see more photographs from the rally.

NWA Democrat-Gazette/ANDY SHUPE
Riders make their way down Dickson Street Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, during the 17th annual Bikes, Blues & BBQ motorcycle rally in Fayetteville. Visit nwadg.com/photos to see more photographs from the rally.

Today (9/21)

9 a.m.-5 p.m. — CAF AirPower History Tour, Arkansas Air and Military Museum

9 a.m.-7:30 p.m. — Baum Motorcycle Village open

11 a.m.-8 p.m. — Arvest Ballpark open

11:30 a.m.-11:30 p.m. — A&M Railroad shuttle

Noon-midnight — Washington County Fairgrounds Saloon open

2-7 p.m. — Military Appreciation Event, Arvest Ballpark, Springdale

3-11 p.m. — Dickson Street Beer Garden open

8 p.m. — Mr. Bikes, Blues and BBQ, Blues Alley Saloon, Washington County Fairgrounds


NWA Democrat-Gazette/ANDY SHUPE Riders make their way Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, along Dickson Street during the 17th annual Bikes, Blues & BBQ motorcycle rally in Fayetteville. Visit nwadg.com/photos to see more photographs from the rally.

NWA Democrat-Gazette/ANDY SHUPE
Riders make their way Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, along Dickson Street during the 17th annual Bikes, Blues & BBQ motorcycle rally in Fayetteville. Visit nwadg.com/photos to see more photographs from the rally.

Friday (9/22)

8 a.m.-7:30 p.m. — Baum Motorcycle Village open

8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. — CAF AirPower History Tour, Arkansas Air and Military Museum

9:30 a.m.-11:30 p.m. — A&M Railroad shuttle

11 a.m.-8 p.m. — Monster Experience, Arvest Ballpark

Noon-midnight — Washington County Fairgrounds Saloon open

2-11 p.m. — Dickson Street Beer Garden open

6 p.m. — Cruise on Dickson for car show

6:15 p.m. — “Bring the Heat” Whataburger Jalapeno Eating Contest, Pabst Blue Ribbon Stage on Dickson Street

6:30-8:30 p.m. — People’s Choice at the Arkansas State BBQ Championship, Washington County Fairgrounds. $10.

7 p.m. — Lawn mower pulls, Washington County Fairgrounds

8 p.m. — Miss BBB Qualifier, Blues Alley Saloon at the Washington County Fairgrounds


NWA Democrat-Gazette/ANDY SHUPE Riders make their way Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, along Dickson Street during the 17th annual Bikes, Blues & BBQ motorcycle rally in Fayetteville. Visit nwadg.com/photos to see more photographs from the rally.

NWA Democrat-Gazette/ANDY SHUPE
Riders make their way Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016, along Dickson Street during the 17th annual Bikes, Blues & BBQ motorcycle rally in Fayetteville. Visit nwadg.com/photos to see more photographs from the rally.

Saturday (9/23)

7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. — Arkansas State BBQ Championship, Washington County Fairgrounds

8 a.m. — Car Show, Arvest Ballpark

8 a.m.-7:30 p.m. — Baum Motorcycle Village open

8 a.m.-11 p.m. — Dickson Street Beer Garden open

8:30 a.m.-12:30 a.m. — A&M Railroad shuttle

9 a.m. – 2 p.m. — Stokes Air “Battle of the Bikes” featuring Fetts Foley Band, Dickson Street. $20.

9 a.m.-5 p.m. — CAF AirPower History Tour, Arkansas Air and Military Museum

11 a.m.-8 p.m. — Monster Experience, Arvest Ballpark

Noon-midnight — Washington County Fairgrounds Saloon open

1 p.m. — Karaoke Wildcard Competition, Blues Alley Saloon at the Washington County Fairgrounds

3 p.m. — Karaoke Finals, Thompson Hall, Washington County Fairgrounds

3:30 p.m. — Parade of Power

7 p.m. — Lawn mower pulls, Washington County Fairgrounds

— Source: bikesbluesandbbq.org

Delta Vs. Southwest Vs. Ozark BBQ

File Photo Brisket, pulled pork, ribs, sausage, cole slaw, baked beans and potato salad fill a plate at Ralph’s Pink Flamingo BBQ in Fort Smith.

File Photo
Brisket, pulled pork, ribs, sausage, cole slaw, baked beans and potato salad fill a plate at Ralph’s Pink Flamingo BBQ in Fort Smith.

Betwixt Memphis and Texarkana, Kansas City and parts beyond, Arkansas stands at a crossroads of magnificent barbecue styles. Here, within our different geographical and geological regions, a blend of thick and thin sauces, meats and preparations, the varieties blend like hickory and oak as their smoke fills the pit.

Arkansas once had its own portion of barbecue on the plate with the use of goat at heritage restaurants such as McClard’s Barbecue in Hot Springs and Craig Brothers in DeValls Bluff. But its barbecue heritage goes back even further. Public events where ditch smoking took place — the act of lining a freshly dug ditch with hot wood and rocks, placing meat to be smoked upon them and then burying the meat under more smoldering wood — were recorded in journals and newspapers of the early 19th century. Such a mention comes from Helena as far back as 1814, where a community gathering was advertised with the call for farmers to bring their pigs, turkeys, ducks, chickens and all to be smoked and shared.

With the homogenization of cuisine that spread through the state after World War II via the automobile and the availability of television, many of our barbecue traditions have disappeared — including smoked goat. What remains is our favorite barbecue condiment, coleslaw, which we slather on our pigmeat sandwiches and buns of beef equally.

While regional delicacies can be cited, Arkansas’s barbecue falls into three categories: Delta, Southwest, and Ozark.

Delta BBQ

The vast Mississippi River Alluvial Plain, once clear cut up to both sides of Crowley’s Ridge, has long been the land of cotton. Rice has become dominant over time, as have crops of wheat, corn and sorghum. Sharecropping and crop farming have long called for as much of the land to be used for crops as possible, leaving little space for the grazing of cattle. Here, barbecue was a matter of avian game, smaller wildlife and pigs. Smoking tends to be pit-style, similar to the ditch smoking of before but in concrete or brick bunkers.

The epitome of this style could easily be shown at the James Beard Award-winning Jones Barbecue Diner in Marianna, where Harold Jones has been smoking pork butts since 1964. The same smoky pork and its secret thin vinegar sauce have been made by members of the family since the Civil War. The meat is served one of three ways — on white bread with slaw, on white bread without slaw, and piled up into an aluminum-foil wrapped heap sold by the pound.

Similarly, the pigmeat sandwiches with their thin hot sauces of the Blytheville area fall into this category, whether with the finely chopped pork on a bun with a hot sauce at Kream Kastle or the granddaddy Dixie Pig (around since 1923) with its fiery pepper sauce served in ketchup bottles to douse your pile of hickory smoked meat.

Southwest BBQ

In reality, this type of barbecue spans two of Arkansas’s regions, the Ouachitas and what natives tend to call Lower Arkansas, a spread which rolls south from the Arkansas River Valley on the western side of the state, over Interstate 30 and on a Doppler-style sweep straight over to Bayou Bartholomew. It includes such vastly different places as Mena, Magnolia and Malvern. It is here that the Texas influence has been allowed to gnaw its way in.

Here, the barbecue is usually smoked in the pit directly over hardwoods such as hickory, oak and pecan (unlike Texas-style mesquite), with beef and chicken taking their places alongside pork ribs and butts. The sauce is thicker and sweeter. A prime example would be Stubby’s Hik’ry Pit Bar-B-Q in Hot Springs, which offers that variety of meats as well as a bean pot — a pot of beans that sits at the bottom of the pit catching juices falling off the meat while smoking.

Ozark BBQ

Thanks to the ridges and valleys of the Ozark plateau, this region remained mostly isolated until the second half of the 20th century. A culture of smokehouse cuisine developed, where hams, sausages and whole turkeys were salted and hung for days to cure in pecan and fruitwood enhanced smoke. Acclaimed purveyors of smoked meats (including the once dominant Ozark Mountain Smokehouse and its satellite locations) offered these succulent samples of savory morsels to tourists and diners alike.

While such smoked meats are still being prepared in the same fashion at the renowned Coursey’s Smoked Meats in St. Joe, it’s the purveyors of barbecue that have truly benefited from these flavors. Smoke plus thicker sauce (more reminiscent of Kansas City-style brown sugar sauces) tend to be more prevalent, as is evidenced in such places as Blacksheep Joe’s in Yellville.

There are other influences out there throughout the region, from Ralph’s Pink Flamingo in Fort Smith with its smoked sausage links; Rivertowne BBQ in Ozark with butter-soft smoked brisket; and the pit-smoked pork ribs and sandwiches at Bubba’s in Eureka Springs — but overall, smoke rules in the Ozarks.

— Kat Robinson

kat@tiedyetravels.com


FAQ

Arkansas BBQ Championship

People’s Choice Contest

WHEN — 6 p.m. Friday

WHERE — Washington County Fairgrounds in Fayetteville

COST — $10

INFO — bikesbluesandbbq.org

Bikes, Blues & BBQ

Vintage Pistol

Vintage Pistol

Festival stages vs. George’s stages

Blues music has become inextricably entwined with the fabric of motorcycle rallies across the country. Perhaps it’s because of the deep American roots the bikes and the blues both share. Whatever the reason, blues musicians — and their genre-crossing peers with elements of rock, country and bluegrass — will once again fill the weekend with free music for the annual Bikes, Blues & BBQ festival. Though other venues across Northwest Arkansas will host their share of musicians welcoming bikers, here are the three main stages closest to all the festival action: Dickson Street’s Pabst Blue Ribbon Stage in the Walton Arts Center parking lot, the Blues Alley Saloon at the Bikes, Blues & BBQ Campground at the Washington County Fairgrounds and, of course, the two stages at Arkansas’ oldest and longest-running live music venue, George’s Majestic Lounge on Dickson Street.

Pabst Blue Ribbon Stage

Dickson Street

Friday

3:30-4:30 p.m. – Leah & the Mojo Doctors

Quarter-finalists at the 2013 International Blues Festival — and 2012 Ozark Blues Challenge winners — Leah & the Mojo Doctors open the PBR Stage on Friday with their high-energy, award-winning presence.

5-6 p.m. – Vintage Pistol

6:30-8 p.m. – The Uncrowned Kings

The Uncrowned Kings bring together the leaders of four prominent Northwest Arkansas bands: Oreo Blue, Big Bad Bubba, Big’uns and the TJ Scarlett Band. The veteran, award-winning musicians form a musical collective deliver rock ‘n’ roll from the ’60s through the ’80s for your listening pleasure.

8:30-10 p.m. – Hot Lix

10:30 p.m.-midnight – Jason D. Williams

Friday’s headliner on the PBR Stage is the dynamic Jason D. Williams, who credits influences like Jerry Lee Lewis, Moon Mullican, Memphis Slim and Al Jolson as inspiration for his raw energy. Blending country, rock ‘n’ roll, rockabilly and more, Williams brings nothing if not a good time to the stage.

Jason D. Williams

Jason D. Williams

Saturday

2-4 p.m. – Mister Lucky

4:30-6 p.m. – Divas On Fire

6:30-8 p.m. – Arkansauce

The four-piece, hometown, “newgrass” favorites Arkansauce released their third album “If I Were You” in April and bring their hard-driving sound to the PBR Stage on Saturday night. Powerful harmonies and heart-felt songwriting, all held together by deep foot-stompin’ bass grooves, define many an Arkansauce performance.

8:30-10 p.m. – The Mixtapes

10:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. – Dead Metal Society

Members of well-known Tulsa bands combine to relive the glory days of ’80s metal bands — the smokin’ solos, screeching vocals, booming drums and all the bombastic beauty that has been forgotten in today’s rock.

Blues Alley Saloon

Bikes Blues & BBQ Campground

Friday

6 p.m.-midnight – Boston Mountain Playboys

Saturday

5:30-8:30 p.m. – Brody Buster

9 p.m.-midnight – Dr. NOLA and the Soul Shakers

George’s Majestic Lounge

on Dickson Street

Friday

Lounge Stage

Noon — Gary Hutchison

3 p.m. — Arkansauce

6 p.m. — Boss Tweeds

8 p.m. — Lucas Parker​

Garden Stage

6:30 p.m. — Oreo Blue

10 p.m. — Mountain Sprout

10:30 p.m. — Vintage Pistol

12:30 a.m. — Groovement

Saturday

Lounge Stage

noon — Gary Hutchison

3 p.m. — Lucas Parker

6 p.m. — Vintage Pistol

The five-piece rock outfit is staying vintage and true to the sounds of the psychedelic, roots and rock giants that came before them.

8 p.m. — Groovement

11 p.m. — Arkansauce

​​Garden Stage

TBD — Jason D. Williams

10 p.m. — Mountain Sprout

Mountain Sprout has the look of wild all over them — in their long beards, the smoking and drinking while they play and on-stage attitudes. The group plays wild and loose too, sawing fiddles or trashing banjos in their songs full of fervor and humor.

— Jocelyn Murphy

jmurphy@nwadg.com

Bikes, Blues & BBQ Harley Vs. Indian

A photographer asked Sturgis motorcycle rally Grand Marshal Jessi Combs to pose for a photo standing next to her Harley-Davidson motorcycle, The Rapid City Journal reported on Aug. 12.

Combs, however, balked when she realized the photo would be taken in front of a semitrailer that carried the huge image of an Indian Motorcycle — suddenly the biggest competitor for cycle dominance at the Sturgis rally.

Combs’ reluctance to be seen in the same frame with a brand of motorcycle other than a Harley-Davidson underscores the renewed rivalry between two iconic American motorcycle brands.

We asked two Northwest Arkansas riders to compare and contrast their experiences.


Courtesy Photo Michael Riha poses with his 2001 American Ironhorse Tejas, the predecessor to his current Harley Softail.

Courtesy Photo
Michael Riha poses with his 2001 American Ironhorse Tejas, the predecessor to his current Harley Softail.

Michael Riha

UA Theatre Department Chairman

Harley-Davidson

Q. When and where did you start riding a motorcycle?

A. I began riding as a teenager. My first bike was a Honda MB-5. It was a 50 CC motorcycle that was a blast to ride, and I got it brand new with money I saved from my paper route and my job at McDonald’s. It was tiny, but it was able to go 50 miles per hour (with a good tail wind!)

I loved the sense of adventure it provided me — that and a sense of isolation. I was able to go out on the county roads where there was little traffic (I lived in Wisconsin) and enjoy just being in the wind. Even at a young age it provided me with a great sense of freedom and time for self-reflection.

Q. How did you fit the stereotype of bikers in that place and time?

A. Well, as far as “stereotypes,” I don’t think I did. I was a skinny teenager when I began. Upon selling the bike when I went to college, I didn’t have a bike again until grad school. That was an old Kawasaki 350 that burned as much oil as it did gas. I loved it, though. It was mine and it, once again, provided me time to get away from my studies (theater design) and center my thoughts without being distracted. I sold it when I took the job here at [the University of ] Arkansas. Seven years after being here I got the itch to get another bike. I stuck with a Honda and rode that for three years. I then upgraded to a custom chopper (American Ironhorse Tejas) that was truly the most amazing piece of machinery I’ve ever ridden. In 2008, I traded it in for my first Harley — a 2008 Softail — Crossbones that I still ride today. I’ve taken that bike on trips to Wisconsin to the 2008 110th Anniversary of Harley Davidson Party. I was able to see the Foo Fighters and Joan Jett. Both were fantastic concerts.

Q. How do you fit the stereotype now?

A. I don’t really believe there is a “stereotype.” If there is, I think I do fit it — middle aged, financially stable, white collar, dude (or dudette!) with a passion for freedom and escape.

Q. Why do you choose a Harley?

I guess I don’t really know other than the fact that I love the look, sound and style of most Harley-Davidson bikes. I don’t think it is the ONLY bike I would ride, but it certainly is at the top of the list.

Q. What will you be doing during Bikes, Blues & BBQ?

A. Well, since it usually happens during one of our tech weeks — or a run of a show! — I am at work most of the time the rally is happening. One thing I absolutely will not miss are the turkey legs! That is a tradition and a must have for me. The rest of the food, I can leave, but I have to get my turkey legs! I also do enjoy some of the blues acts that play in the beer garden. Oh, people watching! That has to be a favorite pastime as well. Some of the outfits are beyond description and should, in and of themselves, be considered works of art — or not.

__

The Free Weekly/CHARLIE KAIJO Jim Hiland, far right, is president of the local Heritage Indian Motorcycle club.

The Free Weekly/CHARLIE KAIJO
Jim Hiland, far right, is president of the local Heritage Indian Motorcycle club.

Jim Hilan

U.S. Navy (Ret.)

Indian

Q. When and where did you start riding a motorcycle?

A. Immediately after high school, I joined the Navy. One of my first purchases was a Honda CB250. As a young sailor, I really enjoyed riding, and I always preferred being on two wheels versus four.

My introduction to riding lasted approximately four years. Along with my 250 I also rode larger displacement Hondas and I cared for and rode my uncle’s Kawasaki while he was serving in Vietnam.

Other interests overtook riding and that was pretty much it until I purchased my 2015 Indian Chieftain. While I had a brief experience with a BMW motorcycle (nice bike) I didn’t ride it much and sold it after a few years of owning it.

Q. How did you fit the stereotype of bikers in that place and time?

A. Since I wasn’t really a rider I didn’t have any rock-solid stereotypes of bikers. Over the years I’ve seen riders that seem a bit harsh and riders that that appeared to share similar interests and values as me. I think you would see this with any large “interest” group. In terms of a stereotype I would say is the main thought that comes to mind is that bikers have always seemed to be passionate about their sport.

Q. How do you fit the stereotype now?

A. It didn’t take long for me to see that motorcycling tends to be one of the great levelers in our society. When it comes to riding It doesn’t matter if you are the CEO of a large company or a young person just starting out in life. When riders get together, it’s really the shared passion for the ride that matters.

While there are many fine motorcycles from many companies I can best speak for the stereotype I have formed for the typical Indian Motorcycle rider. The single word I would use to describe the stereotype of this rider is “family.” It may sound a bit like a cliche, but our local Indian motorcycle riders’ community really is a family. It starts with a dealership staff that’s friendly and supportive. Many of us go to the dealership to just hang out to talk about the latest news from Indian.

We have an active and growing Indian Motorcycle Riders Group, and members enjoy the fellowship that comes with group rides or other social activities. When I purchased my bike I didn’t realize that, over time, the friendships and fellowship that comes with being part of this community would be as important to me as the ride.

Q. Why do you choose a Indian?

A. It turns out the Indian brand was an ideal fit for me. I always liked the heritage and look of Indian Motorcycles. For some reason, Indian Motorcycles touched me in a way that other brands didn’t.

In 2014 Indian Motorcycle launched a whole new model lineup of bikes. When I saw that an Indian dealership popped up in Rogers, I couldn’t resist checking it out. A few steps into the dealership and I knew that I was going to leave with a bike.

Since I had been away from riding for over 30 years and had never been on a large cruiser, I was initially a bit apprehensive. While it’s a bit humorous at this point, I actually let the general manager of the dealership know that I wouldn’t feel comfortable purchasing the bike unless he delivered it to my house. I wanted to get comfortable riding it on my neighborhood streets.

I’m really glad he delivered that bike to me! In less than three years of owning my Chieftain I have logged almost 50,000 miles and have traveled through 25 states. Needless to say, this was a purchase that has changed the entire course of my life!

Q. What will you be doing during Bikes, Blues &BBQ?

A. As I said earlier, Heritage Indian is a great place to just hang out. Our Rider’s Group has planned a very nice ride on Thursday of the rally. Before and after that ride you may very well find me at Heritage Indian chatting with rally goers or members of my Indian motorcycle family about what else — our bikes and the next ride or social event!

— Becca Martin-Brown

bmartin@nwadg.com

Filmmaker Tells Story Of War

 

Courtesy Photo Ken Burns’ new documentary of the Vietnam War utilizes a decade of research and provides perspective from all sides of the conflict.

Courtesy Photo
Ken Burns’ new documentary of the Vietnam War utilizes a decade of research and provides perspective from all sides of the conflict.

The Fayetteville Public Library, in collaboration with AETN, will offer a free sneak peak screening of Ken Burns’ new documentary, “The Vietnam War,” at 2 p.m. Saturday.

“We’ll be showing a 40- to 45-minute screening of one episode, and then we’ll have a panel to discuss those themes from the episode,” says Heather Robideaux, FPL’s manager of adult services. KUAF News Director and “Ozarks at Large” producer Kyle Kellams will moderate the panel discussion, and panelists will include Col. Karen Lloyd, director of the Veterans History Project with the Library of Congress; Roy Reed, author and former UA journalism professor and New York Times and Arkansas Democrat-Gazette journalist; John Brown University professor Preston Jones; and Jim Hale, Vietnam War veteran.

The documentary series took Burns and his team 10 years to produce and includes material and information from close to 80 different participants, including combatants and civilians from North and South Vietnam. Rare archival footage from all over the world is used to tell the story from a variety of perspectives.

“We’ve had a partnership with AETN over the years,” says Robideaux. “They’ve been fabulous to work with in the past, and we were just delighted that they reached out to us for this opportunity.”

— Lara Hightower

lhightower@nwadg.com


 

FAQ

‘The Vietnam War’

WHEN — 2 p.m. Saturday

WHERE — Fayetteville Public Library, 401 W. Mountain St., Fayetteville

COST — Free

INFO — 856-7000 or faylib.org

Preservation Vs. Revilization

1870s house at heart of debate over historic structures

Alexander Nicoll

anicoll@nwadg.com


The Free Weekly/DAVID GOTTSCHALK An exterior view of 306 E. Lafayette St. in Fayetteville. The house, recently purchased by Ben Meade and his wife Jane Hunt Meade, was demolished on Aug. 9.

The Free Weekly/DAVID GOTTSCHALK
An exterior view of 306 E. Lafayette St. in Fayetteville. The house, recently purchased by Ben Meade and his wife Jane Hunt Meade, was demolished on Aug. 9.

Years of water damage stained the walls. Holes in the ceiling exposed the second floor to the first. The staircase creaked, boards straining under the pressure of each footstep. A musty aroma tainted the air, as if someone was rifling through the pages of an old book.

Jane Hunt Meade, the new owner of the storied Stone-Hilton House in Fayetteville, says she and her husband met with three architects about preserving the house. They all gave her the same answer: Tear it down.

“They said if anybody wanted to save it, work should have been done on it decades ago,” she said this summer.

The house was demolished Aug. 9.

Years of neglect led to the desolate state of the 1870s house. Some concerned neighbors in the Washington-Willow Historic District launched a campaign to save it. Others in the area worried more about what property limitations it could have meant if they did, and what kind of building would replace it if they didn’t.

History versus ownership

The Stone-Hilton House spotlights the conflict between preserving history and protecting personal property rights.

The home was listed on the National Register of Historic Places and was a significant structure in the Washington-Willow Historic District in Fayetteville, according to its listing by the Arkansas Heritage Preservation Program.

A structure is considered historic if it is associated with a significant event, person or architectural style, or if it holds important information about the past, according to the register. It also has to be at least 50 years old in most cases.

Recognition alone couldn’t save the house. One of the only protective measures for any historical building is for a city to pass a preservation ordinance.

A preservation ordinance allows cities to regulate what changes can be made to the exterior of buildings in historic districts. Regulations can include what materials may be used in renovation and what architectural features can be included. The aim is to make sure houses’ appearances remain similar to the time periods of the original buildings.

No residential historic districts in Northwest Arkansas have ordinances protecting them. City officials and preservationists have struggled to get neighborhood support because an ordinance would constrain private property rights. Commissions would enforce the rules by requiring property owners to obtain certificates of appropriateness before work could be done in the specified area. A certificate would verify that the proposed work meets the architectural and historical standards of the area.

The Free Weekly/DAVID GOTTSCHALK Water damage is apparent in this interior view of 306 E. Lafayette St.

The Free Weekly/DAVID GOTTSCHALK
Water damage is apparent in this interior view of 306 E. Lafayette St.

Three city ordinances protect nonresidential structures in Northwest Arkansas: the White Hangar at Drake Field in Fayetteville, which houses the Arkansas Air & Military Museum; a two-block area in Rogers’ downtown; and the Shiloh Museum of Ozark History in Springdale and its surrounding property.

Among Bentonville, Rogers, Springdale and Fayetteville, there are 11 historic districts and 482 properties listed on the National Register of Historic Places as either stand-alone structures or as part of the districts.

‘Similar goals’

Many cities struggle to balance historic preservation and population growth.

Northwest Arkansas ranks as the 22nd-fastest-growing metropolitan area in the country, according to estimates from the U.S. Census Bureau. Washington County’s population has increased by a little more than 12 percent since 2010, and Benton County has had an almost 17 percent increase.

Residents often react negatively to the announcement of a new development in an historic area of town, says Greg House, owner of Houses Inc., a Fayetteville-based property management and development company.

“Whenever there is change, people push against it,” he says.

Mark Zweig, founder of Mark Zweig Inc., a development firm based in Fayetteville, served on an historic district commission for a few years in a community near Boston. He says that experience leads him to think people here aren’t ready for a preservation ordinance that would limit their rights as property owners.

“People don’t realize if the historic commission has teeth and can enforce certain standards and maintain the integrity of what’s there, they don’t realize what the ramifications of that are,” he says.

Being told what they can and can’t do to their houses angers property owners, Zweig adds.

Jennifer Henaghan, a deputy research director with the American Planning Association, says development and preservation can be mutually beneficial.

“They have very similar goals,” she says. “They both improve the revitalization of the area and boost tourism.”

Henaghan asserts cities need to have a plan that details the expectations and regulations for historic preservation that residents can consult before conflict arises. Getting that information out would preempt a lot of problems, she says.

Zweig notes many historic districts and homes are close to downtown areas or social hubs where residents want to congregate. The desire to be close to these areas has increased the value of the land over the years, he reveals.

The Stone-Hilton House is an example. From 1995 to 2015, the value of the land increased by 241 percent, while the value of the building increased by 65 percent, according to county records.

Alternatives

Alternatives exist if a building can’t be preserved, says Allyn Lord, director of the Shiloh Museum of Ozark History in Springdale. They include building similar-looking structures to replace old homes, and having someone photograph and record information about an old house before it’s demolished.

House poses that if the old buildings can’t be saved, a new structure should reflect the old.

“It’s easier to get the community to accept change if you’re matching what is already there,” House says. “That’s not a radical change to the community you’re involved in. Secondly, there’s just a market appeal if there’s a cool architectural integrity to it. It can be an asset.”

Owners often preserve historic homes by adapting their use, such as turning a house into an office space or an old post office into a museum.

The Thaden House in Bentonville, built in the mid-1880s, was the home of famed aviator Louise Thaden. It was scheduled for demolition last year but now will be part of the Thaden School, says Clayton Marsh, founding head of the new private school in Bentonville. The house — which was dismantled — will be reassembled at the school’s location.

Marsh suggests the house could be used as a gathering space for the community, a seminar room, a place to house art exhibits or a meeting room for the school’s board.

The Free Weekly/DAVID GOTTSCHALK Joi Knight (left), director of development with Haas Hall Academy, and Stacy Keenan, director of development, walk up the south steps at the new Haas Hall Academy Rogers Campus. The campus is in the former historic Lane Hotel in the Rogers Commercial Historic District.

The Free Weekly/DAVID GOTTSCHALK
Joi Knight (left), director of development with Haas Hall Academy, and Stacy Keenan, director of development, walk up the south steps at the new Haas Hall Academy Rogers Campus. The campus is in the former historic Lane Hotel in the Rogers Commercial Historic District.

The Lane Hotel in the Rogers Commercial Historic District is another example of reuse. The renovated hotel opened this school year as a campus of Haas Hall Academy, a public charter school.

Henaghan says companies throughout the country have been moving headquarters from suburbs closer to downtown areas. Google, for example, refurbished an old Nabisco factory for its offices in Pittsburgh in 2011.

The Department of Arkansas Heritage and the U.S. Interior Department offer tax incentives and grants to those who preserve historic properties. Local preservation societies also provide grants for homeowners to renovate their houses in order to align them with the era in which they were built.

The Stone-Hilton House stood at the center of debate in Fayetteville since the Meades bought the home in May. Concerned residents were worried about what Hunt Meade planned to do with the home. Some appealed to the city’s historic district commission, while others began a Facebook campaign to save the house.

The two-story brick house was built in the Georgian architectural style with Italianate details, according to the Save Stone-Hilton House Facebook page. The style combines symmetrical design with decorative elements such as intricately engraved doors and roof cornices.

Hunt Meade says she has every intention to build a home fitting the architectural integrity of the neighborhood. She has been approved for a building permit for a little more than $800,000 in a neighborhood where houses have recently sold for near a half-million dollars.

She also plans on trying to keep parts of the original house such as the fireplace in the first-floor living room, the basement and a few of the remaining cornices on the roof.

“There’s no way anyone could restore that house, historic commission or not, and have it work out economically,” Zweig resolves.