Archive for Letters

Does life in prison without the possibility of parole not bring “justice”?

Is it the responsibility of the state to bring "justice" to families? Or bring "justice" to society?

From the web

In response to an Arkansas Blog post reporting that Sen. Trent Garner (R-El Dorado) would not attempt to override Governor Hutchinson's veto of Garner's bill to criminalize "mass picketing":

Garner's got so many anger issues, I'm surprised he could speak. Next year he'll be armed and won't have to speak.

JJ

In response to an Arkansas Blog post reporting that the U.S. Supreme Court denied the state's motion to lift the state Supreme Court's stay on the execution of Don Davis:

Cato earlier posted that the victims' families were not being remembered properly. I don't see how you can say that for Gov. Asa [Governor Hutchinson] and Ms. Leslie [Attorney General Leslie Rutledge].

From their remarks, you would think that the death penalty's entire existence is to bring "justice" to the victims' families.

Does life in prison without the possibility of parole not bring "justice"?

Is it the responsibility of the state to bring "justice" to families? Or bring "justice" to society?

I would never claim that any of these murderers is innocent. But neither are we if we have to kill them to find "justice."

Perplexed

Do y'all think that an execution would be a panty-flinging occasion for Miz Rutledge? It seems that the final flutter of the condemned's eyelids might make her eyes roll back in her head and she might not be able to control herself.

Rutrow

In response to the Arkansas Blog's videotape of the angry anonymous man in the red Trump T-shirt excoriating efforts to block the executions scheduled by Governor Hutchinson:

Is there anyone out there who feels comfortable with this guy being able to carry a concealed weapon?

Mountain girl

In response to the Town Hall event held by Sen. Tom Cotton and Rep. French Hill streamed on the Arkansas Blog on Monday:

Thank you, David Ramsey, Jake and Carol for your take on this BS town hall event. Mag and I could only watch about 10 minutes of it, so we missed the part where French Hill sat on Tom Cotton's leg like the dummy Charlie McCarthy of old ... .

I'm hard to make mad, but nothing makes me see red like the lying, condescending Republican assholes our dumber brethren & sisteren voted into office. I've made it almost 62 years without socking an elected politician but I'm not so sure I could keep my cool in a room with people like Cotton, Hill ... hell, anyone with an (R) behind their names in these insane times. 

If one only looks at the videos of Arkansas town hall events, it would seem we can beat these paid tools for the 1 percent in the next election if we'd all just get out and vote. But I know very well that nearly all of my close personal friends are like icebergs ... their ugly parts are beneath the water. Such nice people, hiding a really ugly side.

Anyway, ladies and germs, we're in the fight of our life and our children and grandchildren's lives, too. Our real enemies are the people standing on that stage pictured above. They will strip us bare in the next four years and if we don't stop the Red Team from coast to coast they might misrule over our nation forever! I thought Bush and Cheney were awful and they were, but they were light years better than the Trump Crime Family and Asa's ship of fools. 

I want to thank all the people who took time out of their busy day to go attempt to change the minds of the Unchangeable. I think I know now why our ancestors took rotted fruit, spoiled eggs and tar and feathers with them when they attended political rallies back before cable TV was invented.

Resist! Or face the darkest future we've had to face since the Civil War.

Death by inches

BIG crowd. Several people (on my liberal side of the isle) were so disruptive that it was impossible to hear some questions and answers. Not productive. 

Cotton is good at this. He only squared his shoulders and all but raised his fist (finger) twice. Once to essentially say that if we don't like the way he votes, we can find someone else to do the job. The other time was to say that he met with Governor Hutchinson this morning and told him he fully supports the planned executions. 

I loved his explanation of his vote against the Violence Against Women Act. He objected because there would be confusion about jurisdiction on Indian Territories. Lots of disgruntlement in the crowd over that one.

Carol D. Nokes

In response to the April 6 article about chronic wasting disease in Arkansas's elk and deer populations:

Game and Fish and the U.S. Forest Service are responsible for the chronic wasting in our state by introducing elk and managing the entire ecosystem based on animals they can profit off of. They first said it wouldn't get into deer even though many people told them it would. They'll say it can't transfer to humans until ... . We probably need to kill off 90 percent of the deer in the Ozarks before it spreads and get rid of their drive-through hunting elk scheme.

Also hope we can hold AG&F responsible when people start getting prion-related disorders.

Thom Roberts

Does life in prison without the possibility of parole not bring “justice”?

Is it the responsibility of the state to bring "justice" to families? Or bring "justice" to society?

From the web

In response to an Arkansas Blog post reporting that Sen. Trent Garner (R-El Dorado) would not attempt to override Governor Hutchinson's veto of Garner's bill to criminalize "mass picketing":

Garner's got so many anger issues, I'm surprised he could speak. Next year he'll be armed and won't have to speak.

JJ

In response to an Arkansas Blog post reporting that the U.S. Supreme Court denied the state's motion to lift the state Supreme Court's stay on the execution of Don Davis:

Cato earlier posted that the victims' families were not being remembered properly. I don't see how you can say that for Gov. Asa [Governor Hutchinson] and Ms. Leslie [Attorney General Leslie Rutledge].

From their remarks, you would think that the death penalty's entire existence is to bring "justice" to the victims' families.

Does life in prison without the possibility of parole not bring "justice"?

Is it the responsibility of the state to bring "justice" to families? Or bring "justice" to society?

I would never claim that any of these murderers is innocent. But neither are we if we have to kill them to find "justice."

Perplexed

Do y'all think that an execution would be a panty-flinging occasion for Miz Rutledge? It seems that the final flutter of the condemned's eyelids might make her eyes roll back in her head and she might not be able to control herself.

Rutrow

In response to the Arkansas Blog's videotape of the angry anonymous man in the red Trump T-shirt excoriating efforts to block the executions scheduled by Governor Hutchinson:

Is there anyone out there who feels comfortable with this guy being able to carry a concealed weapon?

Mountain girl

In response to the Town Hall event held by Sen. Tom Cotton and Rep. French Hill streamed on the Arkansas Blog on Monday:

Thank you, David Ramsey, Jake and Carol for your take on this BS town hall event. Mag and I could only watch about 10 minutes of it, so we missed the part where French Hill sat on Tom Cotton's leg like the dummy Charlie McCarthy of old ... .

I'm hard to make mad, but nothing makes me see red like the lying, condescending Republican assholes our dumber brethren & sisteren voted into office. I've made it almost 62 years without socking an elected politician but I'm not so sure I could keep my cool in a room with people like Cotton, Hill ... hell, anyone with an (R) behind their names in these insane times. 

If one only looks at the videos of Arkansas town hall events, it would seem we can beat these paid tools for the 1 percent in the next election if we'd all just get out and vote. But I know very well that nearly all of my close personal friends are like icebergs ... their ugly parts are beneath the water. Such nice people, hiding a really ugly side.

Anyway, ladies and germs, we're in the fight of our life and our children and grandchildren's lives, too. Our real enemies are the people standing on that stage pictured above. They will strip us bare in the next four years and if we don't stop the Red Team from coast to coast they might misrule over our nation forever! I thought Bush and Cheney were awful and they were, but they were light years better than the Trump Crime Family and Asa's ship of fools. 

I want to thank all the people who took time out of their busy day to go attempt to change the minds of the Unchangeable. I think I know now why our ancestors took rotted fruit, spoiled eggs and tar and feathers with them when they attended political rallies back before cable TV was invented.

Resist! Or face the darkest future we've had to face since the Civil War.

Death by inches

BIG crowd. Several people (on my liberal side of the isle) were so disruptive that it was impossible to hear some questions and answers. Not productive. 

Cotton is good at this. He only squared his shoulders and all but raised his fist (finger) twice. Once to essentially say that if we don't like the way he votes, we can find someone else to do the job. The other time was to say that he met with Governor Hutchinson this morning and told him he fully supports the planned executions. 

I loved his explanation of his vote against the Violence Against Women Act. He objected because there would be confusion about jurisdiction on Indian Territories. Lots of disgruntlement in the crowd over that one.

Carol D. Nokes

In response to the April 6 article about chronic wasting disease in Arkansas's elk and deer populations:

Game and Fish and the U.S. Forest Service are responsible for the chronic wasting in our state by introducing elk and managing the entire ecosystem based on animals they can profit off of. They first said it wouldn't get into deer even though many people told them it would. They'll say it can't transfer to humans until ... . We probably need to kill off 90 percent of the deer in the Ozarks before it spreads and get rid of their drive-through hunting elk scheme.

Also hope we can hold AG&F responsible when people start getting prion-related disorders.

Thom Roberts

On ‘Race to Kill’

Unfortunately our society works off of a reactive instead of a proactive way. Providing society with an appropriate education, medical/mental health care, health equity (environment) and livable wages significantly impacts criminality.

From the web

In response to Ernest Dumas' April 6 column, "Race to Kill":

I have to wonder if Mr. Dumas is opposed to the death sentences handed down at Nuremberg and Tokyo after WWII.

Cato

Unfortunately our society works off of a reactive instead of a proactive way. Providing society with an appropriate education, medical/mental health care, health equity (environment) and livable wages significantly impacts criminality.

capenn63

Killing people doesn't stop people from killing people.

jerico-oh-oh

I'm still not seeing that modicum of dignity [Governor Hutchinson] supposedly exhibits. And Leslie [Rutledge], forget about dignity altogether.

Warren

In response to an April 11 Arkansas Blog post, "Congressman Womack gets earful at town hall":

"I'm with Trump" shows that Womack is another right-winger who puts party ahead of the voters. "We have to cut somewhere" might start with a bloated military budget, which their OWN consultants said wasted $125 billion a year so the report was dumped. 

A wall may end up being THE infrastructure bill, a totally useless monument to the idiot class. 

And we can save millions by telling Trump to pick just one extra residence and no security for any others or for his useless kids. He supposedly has money; let the kids pay Blackwater for their own security.

couldn't be better

"I'm with Trump," Womack said.

Well of course he is. The DoD is a budgetary black hole, they can stage a 60 cruise missile (at $1.5 mil a pop) fireworks display for Drumpf to use to threaten China over North Korea while Xi is eating dinner at Mar-A-Grifto, but there's no money for health care.

tsallernarng

Hill's constituency includes many more delusional D-Rats who still haven't come to terms with America's decision that Donald J. Trump is our president. Why subject yourself to the rants and raves of these irrational partisans?

golfer71909

Donald Trump isn't yours or my president. Donald Trump is president. His ego won't let him stray from decades of narcissism. Donald loves Donald; he's the bigly, magnificent one who is the only one capable of solving all of America's problems. Donald will bring back jobs, health care for all, cheaper and much better. Building the wall will show 'em south of the border and will kick off a massive infrastructure program and pump $54 billion into the military. Of course, as his travel expenses grow exponentially, there might not be enough money left.

See how wonderful his eminence Donald Trump is. He will lift the financial burdens from this country and just spend the money himself.

Maxifer

In response to an April 10 Arkansas Blog post, "More headlines for Arkansas: John Grisham raps executions in USA Today":

There is a multiunit scaffold at the Fort Smith museum that could be used for eight by adding two ropes. We could call it a re-enactment of Judge Parker's court, with a picnic lunch and a good time had by all. It might be promoted as part of the marshal's museum. We need to anticipate problems and have alternate sources to solve pressing problems. I would think that 20 years can be classified as pressing. Old ways are sometime good ways.

Going for the record

The only way justice would lose is if any of them are not guilty of the crimes. That is my only concern, and should be the only concern. If there is a chance they are not guilty, then wait. But if they are guilty, then let justice rule, and execute them. 

Otherwise, there haven't been any botched executions. So far, all executed have died, so nothing was botched.

Steven E

My God, Steven E, what a shallow and ignorant understanding of justice. Are you for real, or just some anonymous and idiotic provocateur? It's not just whether they die, but whether it is performed in a constitutionally humane way. And how arrogant of you to think your simple-minded eye-for-an-eye definition of justice is adequate.

PVNasby

I know for some of you, justice would be achieved by getting rid of the death penalty entirely. From that point, there would be no method of execution that would meet the standard. 

That lethal injection is the most humane way, so far, in executing a person is without doubt. That it is imperfect is also not in doubt. I don't hold to an eye for an eye, either. There are, though, some people that can never, ever, be allowed into civilized society. They will hurt and kill and there are only two alternatives, neither of them humane. Life in a cage, or death.

You seek perfection, I seek that which is practical.

Steven E

According to a poll, the majority of Arkansans approve of carrying out the sentences. We don't need outsiders telling us how to conduct our affairs. Then again, that is the Dumbocrat way, government overreach into state's rights. Enough with beating the drums. If you feel strongly about it, go stand in a cornfield outside the prison with a sign. If you can't do the time, then don't do the crime.

Razorblade

On ‘Race to Kill’

Unfortunately our society works off of a reactive instead of a proactive way. Providing society with an appropriate education, medical/mental health care, health equity (environment) and livable wages significantly impacts criminality.

From the web

In response to Ernest Dumas' April 6 column, "Race to Kill":

I have to wonder if Mr. Dumas is opposed to the death sentences handed down at Nuremberg and Tokyo after WWII.

Cato

Unfortunately our society works off of a reactive instead of a proactive way. Providing society with an appropriate education, medical/mental health care, health equity (environment) and livable wages significantly impacts criminality.

capenn63

Killing people doesn't stop people from killing people.

jerico-oh-oh

I'm still not seeing that modicum of dignity [Governor Hutchinson] supposedly exhibits. And Leslie [Rutledge], forget about dignity altogether.

Warren

In response to an April 11 Arkansas Blog post, "Congressman Womack gets earful at town hall":

"I'm with Trump" shows that Womack is another right-winger who puts party ahead of the voters. "We have to cut somewhere" might start with a bloated military budget, which their OWN consultants said wasted $125 billion a year so the report was dumped. 

A wall may end up being THE infrastructure bill, a totally useless monument to the idiot class. 

And we can save millions by telling Trump to pick just one extra residence and no security for any others or for his useless kids. He supposedly has money; let the kids pay Blackwater for their own security.

couldn't be better

"I'm with Trump," Womack said.

Well of course he is. The DoD is a budgetary black hole, they can stage a 60 cruise missile (at $1.5 mil a pop) fireworks display for Drumpf to use to threaten China over North Korea while Xi is eating dinner at Mar-A-Grifto, but there's no money for health care.

tsallernarng

Hill's constituency includes many more delusional D-Rats who still haven't come to terms with America's decision that Donald J. Trump is our president. Why subject yourself to the rants and raves of these irrational partisans?

golfer71909

Donald Trump isn't yours or my president. Donald Trump is president. His ego won't let him stray from decades of narcissism. Donald loves Donald; he's the bigly, magnificent one who is the only one capable of solving all of America's problems. Donald will bring back jobs, health care for all, cheaper and much better. Building the wall will show 'em south of the border and will kick off a massive infrastructure program and pump $54 billion into the military. Of course, as his travel expenses grow exponentially, there might not be enough money left.

See how wonderful his eminence Donald Trump is. He will lift the financial burdens from this country and just spend the money himself.

Maxifer

In response to an April 10 Arkansas Blog post, "More headlines for Arkansas: John Grisham raps executions in USA Today":

There is a multiunit scaffold at the Fort Smith museum that could be used for eight by adding two ropes. We could call it a re-enactment of Judge Parker's court, with a picnic lunch and a good time had by all. It might be promoted as part of the marshal's museum. We need to anticipate problems and have alternate sources to solve pressing problems. I would think that 20 years can be classified as pressing. Old ways are sometime good ways.

Going for the record

The only way justice would lose is if any of them are not guilty of the crimes. That is my only concern, and should be the only concern. If there is a chance they are not guilty, then wait. But if they are guilty, then let justice rule, and execute them. 

Otherwise, there haven't been any botched executions. So far, all executed have died, so nothing was botched.

Steven E

My God, Steven E, what a shallow and ignorant understanding of justice. Are you for real, or just some anonymous and idiotic provocateur? It's not just whether they die, but whether it is performed in a constitutionally humane way. And how arrogant of you to think your simple-minded eye-for-an-eye definition of justice is adequate.

PVNasby

I know for some of you, justice would be achieved by getting rid of the death penalty entirely. From that point, there would be no method of execution that would meet the standard. 

That lethal injection is the most humane way, so far, in executing a person is without doubt. That it is imperfect is also not in doubt. I don't hold to an eye for an eye, either. There are, though, some people that can never, ever, be allowed into civilized society. They will hurt and kill and there are only two alternatives, neither of them humane. Life in a cage, or death.

You seek perfection, I seek that which is practical.

Steven E

According to a poll, the majority of Arkansans approve of carrying out the sentences. We don't need outsiders telling us how to conduct our affairs. Then again, that is the Dumbocrat way, government overreach into state's rights. Enough with beating the drums. If you feel strongly about it, go stand in a cornfield outside the prison with a sign. If you can't do the time, then don't do the crime.

Razorblade

Against mass executions

I would like to add my voice to those expressing horror about our planned Arkansas April executions beginning on Easter Monday.

Against mass executions

I would like to add my voice to those expressing horror about our planned Arkansas April executions beginning on Easter Monday. As a physician, I am particularly troubled by the rush to execute eight people because execution drugs, medications meant for healing, are going to expire and Arkansas won't be able to get more of them because pharmaceutical companies are unwilling to let us have them for the purposes of killing. I also think it's extremely important for everyone to understand that the drug combination is all but guaranteed to cause torture of these humans. Whatever we think of the death penalty and the crimes that these individuals committed, this is not the way for civilized humans to treat each other. Please contact Governor Hutchinson and ask him to stay all of the executions.

Lucy Sauer

Little Rock

Bow to the NRA

Apparently the NRA, the SEC and the evangelical churches pretty much own Arkansas. The legislative message from this session? Guns for everyone anywhere and any place (oops, except for the Razorback Temple of worship). Free speech and assembly? We don't need no stinkin' protest and assembly. Campus cops? We don't need no stinkin' campus cops. What do they know? All our problems will be solved by more guns, more religion, more executions and more corporate influence. Anything else is just "fake news." Ease your mind and just lock and load.

Bill Russell

Maumelle

From the web

In response to last week's cover story, "Suffer the immigrants":

Ours is a country of immigrants, but what part of "illegal immigrants" do people not understand? As with any time that we intentionally break the law there is always the possibility of getting caught and of facing the consequences.

jimsmpsonar

Fear is a terrible thing to live with. Thank you for making people more informed by publishing articles like this one. Knowledge is power. I will repeat what Pope Francis said from the CS Newsletter:

"It's hypocrisy to call yourself a Christian and chase away a refugee or someone seeking help, someone who is hungry or thirsty, toss out someone who is in need of my help," he said. "If I say I am Christian, but do these things, I'm a hypocrite."

The world needs Christians to witness God's mercy through service to the poorest, the sick (and) those who have abandoned their homelands in search of a better future for themselves and their families, he said.

ShineOnLibby

From the web in response to Gene Lyons' March 30 column, "Never his fault":

I think the Affordable Care Act was the crowning achievement of Obama's presidency. I think the Trump repeal plan was extremely flawed.

That said, Gene Lyons' attack on every single thing Trump has done makes this opinion laughable. Lyons is a sore loser — why, not everybody who read his columns voted the way he wanted — and now he sounds, in this column and others on this subject, like a petulant child. 

Ask yourself, looking at Hillary Clinton's record, would she have been a better president? Based on what? Her policy in Libya? It was so disgusting, yet no one ever wants to discuss it, least of all, Gene Lyons.

Where is the unbiased intelligence? He is so willing to bash Trump, yet his undying love for Clinton, etc., is disturbing. How about a deep look at her — never happened during the election year, won't happen now. I believe, based on her Republican hawk record, we would be at war with Iran now. Sorry, ANYTHING would be better than that. Let's wait and see.

Investigator of both sides

@investigator of both sides: Shouldn't we all, including Mr. Lyons, focus our attention on the president we have and not the one we don't? While it is difficult to imagine Ms. Clinton not being a better president than Mr. Trump based on what we've seen so far, it's pointless to speculate about it. We've got plenty of serious, actual issues that need solutions now.

Buckdog

For anyone who has had to deal with a chronic liar as a co-worker, client, boss or spouse, the challenge is always at what point do you find a way to terminate the toxic relationship.

Bow ties are back in style

In response to an Arkansas Blog report that Rep. Kim Hendren's attempt to ban Howard Zinn's books from the public schools had increased interest in his book "A People's History of the United States":

I have to admit the first thing I did upon hearing Hendren's ban attempt was to see if my local library had the book. They do. Seems I wasn't the only one interested either.

It would have been nice if Hendren was as curious. Don't even try to read it? Just try to ban it out of hand? Bright fellow. Very bright and curious fellow indeed, "curious" being used in more than one sense of the word.

Doigotta

Reminds of some years ago when William Manchester's two-volume history "The Glory and the Dream" was controversial in the Conway schools. It made people want to read Manchester's good works just to see what the controversy was about. That's what usually happens.

The Postal Service at one time banned "Lady Chatterley's Lover" from being sent in the mail. The book was passed on from family to family until covers were worn off.

Cato

Correction: A letter to the editor in the March 27 issue of the Times was edited inaccurately. The letter, from Mike Watts, should have read that House Bill 1405 "would also reduce the maximum compensation per employee subject to unemployment taxes from $12,000 per year to $10,000." 

Against mass executions

I would like to add my voice to those expressing horror about our planned Arkansas April executions beginning on Easter Monday.

Against mass executions

I would like to add my voice to those expressing horror about our planned Arkansas April executions beginning on Easter Monday. As a physician, I am particularly troubled by the rush to execute eight people because execution drugs, medications meant for healing, are going to expire and Arkansas won't be able to get more of them because pharmaceutical companies are unwilling to let us have them for the purposes of killing. I also think it's extremely important for everyone to understand that the drug combination is all but guaranteed to cause torture of these humans. Whatever we think of the death penalty and the crimes that these individuals committed, this is not the way for civilized humans to treat each other. Please contact Governor Hutchinson and ask him to stay all of the executions.

Lucy Sauer

Little Rock

Bow to the NRA

Apparently the NRA, the SEC and the evangelical churches pretty much own Arkansas. The legislative message from this session? Guns for everyone anywhere and any place (oops, except for the Razorback Temple of worship). Free speech and assembly? We don't need no stinkin' protest and assembly. Campus cops? We don't need no stinkin' campus cops. What do they know? All our problems will be solved by more guns, more religion, more executions and more corporate influence. Anything else is just "fake news." Ease your mind and just lock and load.

Bill Russell

Maumelle

From the web

In response to last week's cover story, "Suffer the immigrants":

Ours is a country of immigrants, but what part of "illegal immigrants" do people not understand? As with any time that we intentionally break the law there is always the possibility of getting caught and of facing the consequences.

jimsmpsonar

Fear is a terrible thing to live with. Thank you for making people more informed by publishing articles like this one. Knowledge is power. I will repeat what Pope Francis said from the CS Newsletter:

"It's hypocrisy to call yourself a Christian and chase away a refugee or someone seeking help, someone who is hungry or thirsty, toss out someone who is in need of my help," he said. "If I say I am Christian, but do these things, I'm a hypocrite."

The world needs Christians to witness God's mercy through service to the poorest, the sick (and) those who have abandoned their homelands in search of a better future for themselves and their families, he said.

ShineOnLibby

From the web in response to Gene Lyons' March 30 column, "Never his fault":

I think the Affordable Care Act was the crowning achievement of Obama's presidency. I think the Trump repeal plan was extremely flawed.

That said, Gene Lyons' attack on every single thing Trump has done makes this opinion laughable. Lyons is a sore loser — why, not everybody who read his columns voted the way he wanted — and now he sounds, in this column and others on this subject, like a petulant child. 

Ask yourself, looking at Hillary Clinton's record, would she have been a better president? Based on what? Her policy in Libya? It was so disgusting, yet no one ever wants to discuss it, least of all, Gene Lyons.

Where is the unbiased intelligence? He is so willing to bash Trump, yet his undying love for Clinton, etc., is disturbing. How about a deep look at her — never happened during the election year, won't happen now. I believe, based on her Republican hawk record, we would be at war with Iran now. Sorry, ANYTHING would be better than that. Let's wait and see.

Investigator of both sides

@investigator of both sides: Shouldn't we all, including Mr. Lyons, focus our attention on the president we have and not the one we don't? While it is difficult to imagine Ms. Clinton not being a better president than Mr. Trump based on what we've seen so far, it's pointless to speculate about it. We've got plenty of serious, actual issues that need solutions now.

Buckdog

For anyone who has had to deal with a chronic liar as a co-worker, client, boss or spouse, the challenge is always at what point do you find a way to terminate the toxic relationship.

Bow ties are back in style

In response to an Arkansas Blog report that Rep. Kim Hendren's attempt to ban Howard Zinn's books from the public schools had increased interest in his book "A People's History of the United States":

I have to admit the first thing I did upon hearing Hendren's ban attempt was to see if my local library had the book. They do. Seems I wasn't the only one interested either.

It would have been nice if Hendren was as curious. Don't even try to read it? Just try to ban it out of hand? Bright fellow. Very bright and curious fellow indeed, "curious" being used in more than one sense of the word.

Doigotta

Reminds of some years ago when William Manchester's two-volume history "The Glory and the Dream" was controversial in the Conway schools. It made people want to read Manchester's good works just to see what the controversy was about. That's what usually happens.

The Postal Service at one time banned "Lady Chatterley's Lover" from being sent in the mail. The book was passed on from family to family until covers were worn off.

Cato

Correction: A letter to the editor in the March 27 issue of the Times was edited inaccurately. The letter, from Mike Watts, should have read that House Bill 1405 "would also reduce the maximum compensation per employee subject to unemployment taxes from $12,000 per year to $10,000." 

Workers lose

The Republicans' House Bill 1405 (on its way to the governor as this is written) would reduce a worker's eligibility to receive unemployment benefits from 20 to 16 weeks.

Workers lose

The Republicans' House Bill 1405 (on its way to the governor as this is written) would reduce a worker's eligibility to receive unemployment benefits from 20 to 16 weeks. Only Florida, Georgia, Missouri and North Carolina provide fewer than 16 weeks. Most states provide 26 weeks. The bill would also reduce an employer's unemployment taxes, now $12,000 per year, to $10,000. Only 15 states and the District of Columbia have wage limits of $10,000 or less. Seventeen states use more than $20,000 as the wage base.

Sen. Jim Hendren (R-Sulphur Springs) says the tax reduction would allow him to raise wages for his employees. Assuming an unemployment tax rate of 5 percent (the actual rate can vary by employer from less than 1 percent to more than 14 percent), the $2,000 reduction in the tax base would save an employer $100 per year per employee. Over a working year of approximately 2,000 hours, that would provide for a wage increase for that employee of 5 cents per hour! Hendren's employees are probably already contemplating that magnificent raise. And Act 141, already signed into law, newly imposes Arkansas's income tax on workers' unemployment benefits. The picture is clear. With Republicans in control, business wins, workers lose.

Mike Watts

Little Rock

From the web

In response to Max Brantley's March 23 column, "Don't cry for Robert E. Lee":

The South hasn't quit fighting.

No, but Robert E. Lee did and he could have caused the deaths of many more Southerners and the invaders, but he chose the high road. Something you cannot do. Lee did more to heal the wounds than all the laws and bigotry of attitudes like yours.

Lee would be the first to congratulate the governor on his decision, but without the pontificating hate speech you promote. Those who fought against Lee were able to forgive, so what right do you have to continue the hatred?

It is still not too late for you to petition the U.S. government to dig up Mr. Lee and still hang him. Many may think that farcical, but for the Brantleys of the world it is a possibility.

Runner55k

Thank you. Max. Wonderful, pointedly laying out what is so obviously true in the attitudes of many people. I refuse to be quiet any longer with letting people dictate to me what I should believe. I wish that everyone could use the energy they devote to destroying what is good about America. I am descendant of Robert E. Lee, love my Southern heritage, love the Confederate flag (as representative of a different time). But I believe in an America where everyone has the opportunity to get an education, is able to vote, has medical care and with laws that protect the helpless and pride in our law enforcement officers, judges, and our representatives in Washington. Do not understand why if people want less federal interference they are so busy adding more laws that are unnecessary. Oh, my goodness, I am ranting!

Ann Wiggins

From the web in response to a March 23 Arkansas Blog item, "It's official: Arkansas Senate resolution blames refs for Hog loss; calls for ref education":

Ingram and Hutchison ought to reimburse the taxpayers for this waste of time. 

Will the Legislature please go home and stop wasting our taxes!

Richard929293

That will surely go over well with SEC football and basketball officials. What a bunch of whiny, crybaby losers. Get over the fact your team gave up the first 8 and the last 12 points in the game.

Sound Policy

WTF? Seriously, what exactly is there the current legislators think they can't do better than dedicated professionals?

Because it's not medicine or education. Now it's basketball officiating? 

And Sound is right about future officiating. Officials aren't likely to take kindly to this sort of bullshit.

Vanessa

Geez! This session has gone on way too long!

fiveoclocksomewhere

They are just joining my longtime mission, but mine is confined to better education for people elected to the Arkansas General Assembly, since so many of their deeds always cost Arkie taxpayers huge fees for court settlements in throwing out much of their legislative "productions."

Cato

If Wally Hall said the refs were bad, I'll go with his observation. Unless something is done to follow up, the bad calls would be ignored. Maybe something at this level will get the NCAA's attention. What does it hurt given all of the serious stuff they have been dealing with. Youse guys need to lighten up.

Razorblade

I love it. Some people need to lighten up. It's a stressful job. Let them have a little fun with something that does nothing more than show pride and support for the state's biggest team. The coaches and players sure can't say anything to defend themselves. Yes, there are more important things to deal with, but everyone needs a smile every once in a while. No harm, no foul (pun intended).

Dallas Timpton

Workers lose

The Republicans' House Bill 1405 (on its way to the governor as this is written) would reduce a worker's eligibility to receive unemployment benefits from 20 to 16 weeks.

Workers lose

The Republicans' House Bill 1405 (on its way to the governor as this is written) would reduce a worker's eligibility to receive unemployment benefits from 20 to 16 weeks. Only Florida, Georgia, Missouri and North Carolina provide fewer than 16 weeks. Most states provide 26 weeks. The bill would also reduce the maximum compensation per employee subject to unemployment taxes from $12,000 per year to $10,000. Only 15 states and the District of Columbia have wage limits of $10,000 or less. Seventeen states use more than $20,000 as the wage base.

Sen. Jim Hendren (R-Sulphur Springs) says the tax reduction would allow him to raise wages for his employees. Assuming an unemployment tax rate of 5 percent (the actual rate can vary by employer from less than 1 percent to more than 14 percent), the $2,000 reduction in the tax base would save an employer $100 per year per employee. Over a working year of approximately 2,000 hours, that would provide for a wage increase for that employee of 5 cents per hour! Hendren's employees are probably already contemplating that magnificent raise. And Act 141, already signed into law, newly imposes Arkansas's income tax on workers' unemployment benefits. The picture is clear. With Republicans in control, business wins, workers lose.

Mike Watts

EDITOR'S NOTE: The above letter should say "The bill would also reduce the maximum compensation per employee subject to unemployment taxes from $12,000 per year to $10,000." The letter was edited incorrectly.

Little Rock

From the web

In response to Max Brantley's March 23 column, "Don't cry for Robert E. Lee":

The South hasn't quit fighting.

No, but Robert E. Lee did and he could have caused the deaths of many more Southerners and the invaders, but he chose the high road. Something you cannot do. Lee did more to heal the wounds than all the laws and bigotry of attitudes like yours.

Lee would be the first to congratulate the governor on his decision, but without the pontificating hate speech you promote. Those who fought against Lee were able to forgive, so what right do you have to continue the hatred?

It is still not too late for you to petition the U.S. government to dig up Mr. Lee and still hang him. Many may think that farcical, but for the Brantleys of the world it is a possibility.

Runner55k

Thank you. Max. Wonderful, pointedly laying out what is so obviously true in the attitudes of many people. I refuse to be quiet any longer with letting people dictate to me what I should believe. I wish that everyone could use the energy they devote to destroying what is good about America. I am descendant of Robert E. Lee, love my Southern heritage, love the Confederate flag (as representative of a different time). But I believe in an America where everyone has the opportunity to get an education, is able to vote, has medical care and with laws that protect the helpless and pride in our law enforcement officers, judges, and our representatives in Washington. Do not understand why if people want less federal interference they are so busy adding more laws that are unnecessary. Oh, my goodness, I am ranting!

Ann Wiggins

From the web in response to a March 23 Arkansas Blog item, "It's official: Arkansas Senate resolution blames refs for Hog loss; calls for ref education":

Ingram and Hutchison ought to reimburse the taxpayers for this waste of time. 

Will the Legislature please go home and stop wasting our taxes!

Richard929293

That will surely go over well with SEC football and basketball officials. What a bunch of whiny, crybaby losers. Get over the fact your team gave up the first 8 and the last 12 points in the game.

Sound Policy

WTF? Seriously, what exactly is there the current legislators think they can't do better than dedicated professionals?

Because it's not medicine or education. Now it's basketball officiating? 

And Sound is right about future officiating. Officials aren't likely to take kindly to this sort of bullshit.

Vanessa

Geez! This session has gone on way too long!

fiveoclocksomewhere

They are just joining my longtime mission, but mine is confined to better education for people elected to the Arkansas General Assembly, since so many of their deeds always cost Arkie taxpayers huge fees for court settlements in throwing out much of their legislative "productions."

Cato

If Wally Hall said the refs were bad, I'll go with his observation. Unless something is done to follow up, the bad calls would be ignored. Maybe something at this level will get the NCAA's attention. What does it hurt given all of the serious stuff they have been dealing with. Youse guys need to lighten up.

Razorblade

I love it. Some people need to lighten up. It's a stressful job. Let them have a little fun with something that does nothing more than show pride and support for the state's biggest team. The coaches and players sure can't say anything to defend themselves. Yes, there are more important things to deal with, but everyone needs a smile every once in a while. No harm, no foul (pun intended).

Dallas Timpton

Traditional schools

As a student who has attended Little Rock public schools since pre-K, I have gotten a firsthand look at what makes public schools great.

Traditional schools

As a student who has attended Little Rock public schools since pre-K, I have gotten a firsthand look at what makes public schools great. With the pro-charter school agendas of President Trump and his secretary of education, our education system could lose public schools and their great qualities altogether. Charter schools don't have to follow the same rules as public schools, so they aren't required to offer the same services as public schools. Charter schools don't have to offer transportation, such as school buses for students, which I think is a must-have for any school. Charter schools want to "transform our public school system," but when you don't offer transportation you are keeping children that have no means of getting to school from attending a charter school. No free transportation to charter schools is keeping children who want a better education from leaving problem schools to attend a charter school. I would hate to see a world where schools didn't offer free transportation and many of the programs in current public schools to their students.

John Swaim

Little Rock

Economic Darwinism at work

How 'bout that Trump Budget?

I loved the way Mick Mulvaney, budget director, characterized the budget as "perhaps" the most "compassionate" budget ever.

I watched Mulvaney proudly recite how his budget was tailor-made to fulfill Agent Orange's campaign promises.

The ugly truth is, what I witnessed with barely restrained horror, was selective euthanasia: economic Darwinism at work carried out by Trump's budget priorities.

The weakest among us, poor children on the one end and helpless seniors clinging to the other, must go. Keeping them alive, as Mulvaney so smugly asserted, "isn't producing satisfactory results." He's right; most are still alive.

Agent Orange views their existence as unworthy, even burdensome to those of us who are blessed with good health and a job. His budget will fill the cracks beneath the feet of the living with the carcasses of the poor and defenseless.

Now throw in a health care plan that is clumsily and speciously crafted to nail the coffin on seniors who somehow beat the system, and what have you got?

Come on Arkansas. You voted overwhelmingly for this monster, what have you done?

Please don't assume you know my politics, because you don't.

This is a moral issue.

Harry Hergert Little Rock

From the web

In response to Gene Lyons' March 16 column, "More on pits":

Gene Lyons, visit your local shelter. The majority of the homeless dogs are pit bulls. Meet those pit bulls and see real danger that you write about. You are a part of the reason pit bulls get euthanized, abused and neglected more than any other breed. Oh wait, I forgot, pit bulls aren't a "real breed" right? I am a volunteer at my local shelter and "breeds" are meaningless. These animals are scared, alone and desperate for a family. Pit bulls, no matter how kind and gentle, are always there the longest. What more torture and misfortune do you wish upon these innocent animals? Yes, many pit bulls are bred for fighting. That is a terrible crime and those dogs can be rehabilitated. When dogs are made to fight, they are being tortured. They need to be rescued. On behalf of rescuers and loving dogs, I employ you to write an article apologizing for your ignorance on this matter.

Susan Swanay

As an American citizen, I understand you have the right to your opinion; however, your news piece is really an editorial. I am outraged that you choose to belittle a loving and docile collection of dogs. Pit bull-type dogs cover hundreds of mixed breeds. If you would look back in history, pit bull-type dogs were called nanny dogs because they took great care of children. Your picture indicates that you are perhaps old enough to remember the television show "The Little Rascals," in which a pit bull-type dog was the star. 

Dog aggression is not natural for any breed. Remember, dogs are domesticated, which by Merriam-Webster's definition means "to adapt (an animal or plant) to life in intimate association with and to the advantage of humans."

Illiterate, non-responsible and perhaps greedy humans have chosen a very loyal breed (meaning a breed that really wants to do what is asked by his human) to dogfight or be vicious. The owner is training a domesticated animal to do vile things. Many pit bull-type dogs are tortured, and/or given cocaine to alter their normal docile personality. Pit bull-type dogs are often put to death in a horrific fashion if they choose not to fight.

The humans have the issues, not the dogs. Yes, innocent humans suffer at the hands of terrible and perhaps psychopathic people, just as innocent people suffer and are maimed by distracted drivers. Hmm. Maybe that's a cause you could take up, and leave the innocent pit bull-type dogs alone.

Diane Gardner

Diane, this is a column, not a news piece. So yes, it's opinion. It's supposed to be.

And dogs evolved from wolves. Claiming they are not naturally aggressive is naive/uninformed at best. They are no longer wild, but one of the reasons humans and dogs struck up a relationship was because dogs are protective. That some humans have taken advantage of that natural aggression in an extreme way doesn't negate the science. 

Vanessa

Correction: In last week's Readers Choice edition, we mistakenly identified I Love Juice Bar as the winner in the Yogurt/smoothies category in a photo caption. Red Mango was the winner.

Traditional schools

As a student who has attended Little Rock public schools since pre-K, I have gotten a firsthand look at what makes public schools great.

Traditional schools

As a student who has attended Little Rock public schools since pre-K, I have gotten a firsthand look at what makes public schools great. With the pro-charter school agendas of President Trump and his secretary of education, our education system could lose public schools and their great qualities altogether. Charter schools don't have to follow the same rules as public schools, so they aren't required to offer the same services as public schools. Charter schools don't have to offer transportation, such as school buses for students, which I think is a must-have for any school. Charter schools want to "transform our public school system," but when you don't offer transportation you are keeping children that have no means of getting to school from attending a charter school. No free transportation to charter schools is keeping children who want a better education from leaving problem schools to attend a charter school. I would hate to see a world where schools didn't offer free transportation and many of the programs in current public schools to their students.

John Swaim

Little Rock

Economic Darwinism at work

How 'bout that Trump Budget?

I loved the way Mick Mulvaney, budget director, characterized the budget as "perhaps" the most "compassionate" budget ever.

I watched Mulvaney proudly recite how his budget was tailor-made to fulfill Agent Orange's campaign promises.

The ugly truth is, what I witnessed with barely restrained horror, was selective euthanasia: economic Darwinism at work carried out by Trump's budget priorities.

The weakest among us, poor children on the one end and helpless seniors clinging to the other, must go. Keeping them alive, as Mulvaney so smugly asserted, "isn't producing satisfactory results." He's right; most are still alive.

Agent Orange views their existence as unworthy, even burdensome to those of us who are blessed with good health and a job. His budget will fill the cracks beneath the feet of the living with the carcasses of the poor and defenseless.

Now throw in a health care plan that is clumsily and speciously crafted to nail the coffin on seniors who somehow beat the system, and what have you got?

Come on Arkansas. You voted overwhelmingly for this monster, what have you done?

Please don't assume you know my politics, because you don't.

This is a moral issue.

Harry Hergert Little Rock

From the web

In response to Gene Lyons' March 16 column, "More on pits":

Gene Lyons, visit your local shelter. The majority of the homeless dogs are pit bulls. Meet those pit bulls and see real danger that you write about. You are a part of the reason pit bulls get euthanized, abused and neglected more than any other breed. Oh wait, I forgot, pit bulls aren't a "real breed" right? I am a volunteer at my local shelter and "breeds" are meaningless. These animals are scared, alone and desperate for a family. Pit bulls, no matter how kind and gentle, are always there the longest. What more torture and misfortune do you wish upon these innocent animals? Yes, many pit bulls are bred for fighting. That is a terrible crime and those dogs can be rehabilitated. When dogs are made to fight, they are being tortured. They need to be rescued. On behalf of rescuers and loving dogs, I employ you to write an article apologizing for your ignorance on this matter.

Susan Swanay

As an American citizen, I understand you have the right to your opinion; however, your news piece is really an editorial. I am outraged that you choose to belittle a loving and docile collection of dogs. Pit bull-type dogs cover hundreds of mixed breeds. If you would look back in history, pit bull-type dogs were called nanny dogs because they took great care of children. Your picture indicates that you are perhaps old enough to remember the television show "The Little Rascals," in which a pit bull-type dog was the star. 

Dog aggression is not natural for any breed. Remember, dogs are domesticated, which by Merriam-Webster's definition means "to adapt (an animal or plant) to life in intimate association with and to the advantage of humans."

Illiterate, non-responsible and perhaps greedy humans have chosen a very loyal breed (meaning a breed that really wants to do what is asked by his human) to dogfight or be vicious. The owner is training a domesticated animal to do vile things. Many pit bull-type dogs are tortured, and/or given cocaine to alter their normal docile personality. Pit bull-type dogs are often put to death in a horrific fashion if they choose not to fight.

The humans have the issues, not the dogs. Yes, innocent humans suffer at the hands of terrible and perhaps psychopathic people, just as innocent people suffer and are maimed by distracted drivers. Hmm. Maybe that's a cause you could take up, and leave the innocent pit bull-type dogs alone.

Diane Gardner

Diane, this is a column, not a news piece. So yes, it's opinion. It's supposed to be.

And dogs evolved from wolves. Claiming they are not naturally aggressive is naive/uninformed at best. They are no longer wild, but one of the reasons humans and dogs struck up a relationship was because dogs are protective. That some humans have taken advantage of that natural aggression in an extreme way doesn't negate the science. 

Vanessa

Correction: In last week's Readers Choice edition, we mistakenly identified I Love Juice Bar as the winner in the Yogurt/smoothies category in a photo caption. Red Mango was the winner.